Sign In
   
  Forgot your username ? Click here !
--------------------OR--------------------

Please submit the details below to send us your details to help us track your username.



CAPTCHA Image
[Different Image]

Exotic India takes your privacy very seriously. The information you provide above will not be shared with anybody.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6

Displaying 315 of 657      Previous | Next

The Classical Music of North India (The Music of the Baba Allauddin Gharana as taught by Ali Akbar Khan at the Ali Akbar College of Music): Volume One The First Years Study

The Classical Music of North India (The Music of the Baba Allauddin Gharana as taught by Ali Akbar Khan at the Ali Akbar College of Music): Volume One The First Years Study

Specifications

Item Code: IMD05

by Ali Akbar Khan ,
Notations and Explanatory text by George Ruckert

Hardcover (Edition: 2012)

Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
ISBN 9788121508728

Language: English
Size: 10.0" X 7.2"
Pages: 381 (B & W Illus: 19)
Weight of the Book: 910 gms
Price: $42.50   Shipping Free
Viewed times since 2nd Sep, 2013

Description

About the Book:

This is a book of and about the classical music of North India, among the oldest continual musical traditions of the world. Presented here is a small part of the musical legacy of one of the foremost families which has preserved and collected this ancient music and developed it to the highest standards: the Baba Allauddin Gharana of the Seni tradition. This volume introduces the great richness and variety of the different styles of music as taught by one of the century's greatest musicians, Ali Akbar Khan.

Preface

This is a book of and about the classical music of North India; among the oldest continual musical traditions of the world. Presented here is a small part of the musical legacy of one of the foremost families which has preserved and collected this ancient music and developed it to the highest standards: the Baba Allauddin Gharana of the Seni tradition. This volume introduces the great richness and variety of the different styles of music as taught by one of this century's greatest musicians, Ali Akbar Khan.

Preparing a book on Indian music in the name of perhaps its foremost practitioner has not been an easy task. Even though I have studied with Ustad Khan for more than twenty-five years every time I wrote a word, I felt I had either all India or all Music looking over my shoulder. Indeed, Khansahib (as Ali Akbar is known to friends and students) represents both: he is at once an embodiment of India's great musical tradition (and all that this magnificent music an cultural legacy represent), as well as an individual musician of towering eminence. His language is not just Hindi or Indian or American or highbrow or raga-and-tala: it is just music, and cannot be obfuscated or dimmed by the grasping possessiveness of any one cultural, artistic, or social group. It speaks to everyone with or without experience of India or special musical initiation. In the rare and lofty heights to which we are taken by this great artist, most people are usually stunned to silence.

This awe has certainly bee a stumbling block in proceeding, for although it has been nearly fifteen years since Khansahib requested this beginning book, I have had to realize that the project ever required a larger book but at the same time a simpler one. Many people around the world look to Khansahib for musical guidance, and the book has had to address the needs of students of many backgrounds and cultural attitudes.

For Khansahib, and most musicians of this classical tradition, music is a process, a way of thinking about a divine intermingling of sound, art, and life-like some other kinds of music to a certain degree, but also unique. To represent it only as a product reduces it to something only partially viable-and this half-truth is difficult for "Indian" musicians to accept as a realistic representation of their tradition. Hence, the result: a great measure of humble silence, even reluctance to speak, by the musicians themselves in the face of the sacred immensities of music.

Over the centuries, this music has been used as a yoga, a spiritual discipline, practiced by musicians without idea of worldly reward. But it has also been a concert music in the splendor of court chambers, and more modestly in the homes of patrons in all walks of life. It has lived in the temples and in the tents of armies. It has been the vehicle for the divine expression of saints and of actors portraying sacred dramas. It has been subject to both the refinement and decadence of thousands of musicians in the service of both wise kings and foolish emperors. Through its millions of lives, it has developed freshness and preserved oldness-an incredibly rich artistic method of weaving sound pattern in which can be seen the many facets of the musical life of mankind, both public and private.

Our sages developed music from time immemorial for the mind to take shelter in that pure being which stands apart as one's true self. Real music is not for wealth, not for honors, or not even for the joys of the mind-it is one kind of yoga, a path for realization and salvation to purify your mind and heart and give you longevity.

Ali Akbar Khan

I hope that the quality and nature of the music to follow will reward everyone, from beginner to professional. Indeed, the scope alone of the musical styles represented is more complete than in any other published survey published in the West. But the form of presentation will naturally generate a number of questions: "Why didn't you put it in Western notation?" "Why are there no cassettes?" "Why haven't you put in more sitar music?" "Why did you choose Rag Marwa over Rag Bhupali in a beginning book?" I have attempted to answer some of these questions in the Introduction and text of the book. But another response is that is the beginning of a larger project-the presenting of the music of Ustad Ali Akbar Khan in many volumes, which will include instruction manuals for particular instruments and a series of learning cassette tapes. But providing a background with the broadest viewpoint in mind was considered the best starting place, and this is the idea behind this first volume.

In trying to cover the great expanse of music history, style, and theory which are presented to us in this music, I have constantly been self-conscious of the superficial qualities of the descriptions; this is especially true in the omission of the immense personal contributions of so many of India's other great musicians. This book is written from the important, but decidedly non-Western, perspective of the approach from India's guru-shishya tradition-that is, in pursuing the understanding of one guru's point of view, the disciple gets the lesson; in pursuing everything, the disciple gets the lesson; in pursuing everything, the disciple gets nothing. I have tried, especially in the areas of vocabulary and terminology, to bring the reader into a basic awareness of the scope of what this great tradition embraces. For experienced students in India and elsewhere, I am sure they will feel that much has been glossed over-on the other hand, they may be rewarded with the simplicity of the way that one of their great musicians has presented his music (albeit with the warps in understanding that ever attend even the most earnest disciples.) This book comes out of many years' study with Khansahib at the Ali Akbar College of Music in California. In his weekly four days of teaching, Khansahib normally teaches a two-hour vocal class followed by a two-hour instrumental class. The music in this book was generated in these classes, and has been heard, sung, and played by many of his students. It was reviewed in subsequent lessons, and sometimes re-taught later in alternative versions. The versions presented here are chosen for their beauty and simplicity, over other perhaps more highly ornamented or unusual ones. The music presented here is only a drop in the ocean of Khansahib's creative output at the College, which, when published, will require more than forty volumes.

The format of the book has been with the practical musician in mind. In typesetting he music, choices have been made with the idea foremost of the student's sitting on the floor and reading from a slight distance, as would be normal in the practice of the music. After a brief explanatory introduction. The music itself comes first in the book's layout. The bulk of the text is in the back, where it is intended to be useful for reference. This is to reinforce the central idea that it is the music itself which will reveal its secrets, and that a knowledge of the theory and history is secondary.

Most of the titles of musicians have been left off in the text. For example, in India one would never refer to the eminently respected sitarist Ravi Shankar without a form of address or a title (in this case "Pandit," or "Panditji"), and similarly with other great musicians (see the chapter "Manners Among Musicians"). But in the West we say "Bach" and "Beethoven," or similarly, "Arturo Toscanini" or "Horowitz" without titles polite forms of address in person. This is the convention in this book, and I hope that Indian friends will recognize this as a literary convention rather than a lack of respect. Exceptions are made with Ustad Allauddin Khansahib and in the use along of the name "Khansahib" for Ali Akbar Khan.

When Khansahib is speaking directly, his further words appear in italics without citation. All other quotes have their author's name appended.

About the Author:

Ali Akbar Khan is a composer, educator and internationally renowned performer of the classical music of North India on the seventy-five stringed plucked lute, the sarod. Founder of centers of learning in India, the United States and Europe, he is the recent recipient of the MacArthus Fellowship for distinguished achievement in his service to music. Today he lives with his wife Mary Johnson Khan, and family in San Anselmo, California and teaches at the Ali Akbar Khan College of Music in San Refel. He spends three months of the year performing and teaching in Europe, India and throughout the world.

George Ruckert has been disciple of Ali Akbar Khan for nearly twenty-five years, learning the sarod, violin and vocal music. He helped to found the Ali Akbar Khan College of Music in California and served for many years as an instructor and administrator. Also a teacher and performer of Western Music, he is especially qualified to convey the music and teachings of his mentor. He is presently completing his dissertation at the University of California, Berkeley on the music of Ali Akbar Khan.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Photographs
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Getting Started
Notation
Guide to Pronunciation

Bhairav
Bhairavi
Asawari
Alhaiya Bilawal
Todi
Kafi
Khammaj
Kalyan
Puriya Dhanashri
Marwa

Exercises
Rhythm and Tal
Biographies

Allauddin Khansahib
Ali Akbar Khansahib

Manners among Musicians

Theory

Theory of Rag
Classification of Rag
Mood and Effect
Ornamentation

Form

Form
Dhrupad
Khyal
Light classical music
Instrumental music

History
Major Treatises
Language

Language and Iyric
Glossary

Bibliography
Sources for publications
Index of First Lines
Index

Displaying 315 of 657      Previous | Next

Customer Comments

Post a Comment
 
 

Post Review
My Gallery
You can keep adding items you like to this gallery as a Wish List. If you Sign In we will remember your Gallery for your future reuse.
Delete | Add to Cart
Sign In | Register to save to My Gallery
Related Items

ssl certificates
TRUSTe online privacy certification
We accept PayPal  VISA  MasterCard  Discover  American Express
Site Powered by www.unlimitedfx.com