Sign In
   
  Forgot your username ? Click here !
--------------------OR--------------------

Please submit the details below to send us your details to help us track your username.



CAPTCHA Image
[Different Image]

Exotic India takes your privacy very seriously. The information you provide above will not be shared with anybody.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6

Diwali Special Sale!! 20% OFF ON ALL ITEMS WITH FREE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE
Displaying 246 of 1403      Previous | Next

Principles of Buddhist Tantra (A Discourse on Cittavisuddhi-prakarana of Aryadeva)

Principles of Buddhist Tantra (A Discourse on Cittavisuddhi-prakarana of Aryadeva)

Specifications

Item Code: IDK434

by Mathew Varghese

Hardcover (Edition: 2008)

Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi
ISBN 9788121511902

Size: 8.8" X 5.7"
Pages: 300
Price: $42.50
Discounted: $34.00   Shipping Free
Viewed times since 17th Mar, 2014

Description

From the Jacket

This work is a textual based discourse on the Cittavisuddhi-prakarana of Aryadeva, a seminal text which describes the principle and philosophy of Buddhist Tantra. The dispute on the question of Tantric meditative practices having any philosophical foundation or whether those practices have been introduced into the ethico-religious praxis of various religious traditions as a later introduction is a continuing discussion. In this work, it is trying to prove that the introduction of Tantra into Madhyamika philosophy is a natural development and it is proved beyond doubt by reviewing an important work in the Buddhist tradition written by Aryadeva, the Cittavisuddhi-prakarana. The unique dialectical method introduced and used by the Madhyamikas to interpret their philosophy and the conception of sunyata is the guiding principle in this regard. Madhyamika envisages that the conception of sunyata can be interpreted as the proper understanding of the insubstantial nature of object of the world (dharma-nairatmya) and the insubstantial nature of the subjective self which perceives such objects of the world (pudgala-nairatmya). The dialectics advanced by the Madhyamika is efficient in deconstructing the substantiality of the phenomenal world of objects, but that is effectively possible only after reconstructing the notion of a substantive self using Tantric spiritual practices. The sunyata as the conception of dharma-nairatmya is achieved through reconstructing the substantive notion of the phenomenal world using dialectics, while it as the conception of pudgala-nairatmya is achieved using Tantric spiritual practices.

Mathew Varghese is a scholar of the early Madhyamika philosophy of Nagarjuna and Aryadeva, and shows a keen interest in researching their philosophical method and interpreting it in contemporary perspective. He received his PhD from the University of Madras. He has published a number of articles on Buddhist philosophy and now working on a book about the scope and conception of negative arguments in Philosophy based on pre-Buddhistic and Hellenic thought which would be published soon. He is now teaching at Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo, Japan.

About Principles of Buddhist Tantra

The work is a textual based discourse on the Cittavisuddhi-prakarana of Aryadeva, a seminal text which describes the principle and philosophy of Buddhist Tantra. The dispute on the question of Tantric meditative practices having any philosophical foundation or whether those practices have been introduced into the ethico-religious praxis of various religious traditions as a later introduction is a continuing discussion. In this work, it is trying to prove that the introduction of Tantra into Madhyamika philosophy is a natural development and it is proved beyond doubt by reviewing an important work in the Buddhist tradition written by Aryadeva, the Cittavisuddhi-prakarana. The unique dialectical method introduced and used by the Madhyamikas to interpret their philosophy and the conception of sunyata is the guiding principle in this regard. Madhyamika envisages that the conception of sunyata can be interpreted as the proper understanding of the insubstantial nature of object of the world (dharma-nairatmya) and the insubstantial nature of the subjective self which perceives such objects of the world (dharma-nairatmya) and the insubstantial nature of the subjective self which perceives such objects of the world (pudgala-nairatmya). The dialectics advanced by the Madhyamika is efficient in deconstructing the substantiality of the phenomenal world of objects, but that is effectively possible only after reconstructing the notion of a substantive self using Tantric spiritual practices. The sunyata as the conception of dharma-nairatmya is achieved through reconstructing the substantive notion of the phenomenal world using dialectics, while it as the conception of pudgala-nairatmya is achieved using Tantric spiritual practices.

Mathew Varghese is a scholar of the early Madhyamika philosophy of Nagarjuna and Aryadeva, and shows a keen interest in researching their philosophical method and interpreting it in contemporary perspective. He received his PhD from the University of Madras. He has published a number of articles on Buddhist philosophy and now working on a book about the scope and conception of negative arguments in Philosophy based on pre-Buddhistic and Hellenic thought which would be published soon. He is now teaching at Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo, Japan.

Preface

A Study of This Kind on the text of Cittavisuddhi-prakrana by Aryadeva might confuse many scholars as the historicity of Aryadeva-the Madhyamika and Aryadeva-the Tantric, is an unsettled dispute yet. However, here the attempt is not to settle this dispute on the historicity of these personalities, but to review the principles of Buddhist Tantra from the perspective of early Madhyamika philosophy of Nagarjuna and Aryadeva. Another aspect taken here for serious consideration is a proper understanding of the conception of sunyata, introduced and interpreted by the early Madhyamika and its innate relationship with the Tantric spiritual practices. It is argued that a proper understanding of the conception of sunyata is possible only with the proper conception of pudgala-nairatmya, and that is possible only with a proper appreciation of Tantric systems. The Tantric spiritual practices are the only structure that provides a foundation to human personality. The psycho-experiential method of the Tantric is the only method that can restructure that human mind from all its conceptual formulations; in that respect it is one of the most efficient spiritual techniques evolved. In essence, the discussion is based on remaking of man without losing his fundamental nature and it is possible only by reconstructing the psycho-physical personality. Man confronts challenges always as a part of his life and he should find suitable philosophical and spiritual methods to redress his worries and concerns. There is nothing called an idealistic situation where man lives without any worries. In this work, we see the methods that can be used to make possible the life bearable for man, where he should be ready to remake himself by appeasing his own dispositions (upaya) using his natural wisdom (prajna).

The discussions here are following the method of reviewing the discussions of the text based on various aspects of Madhyamika philosophy on the basis of a contemporary understanding of it. In some places, the discussion may be repetitive but it is to understand the same discussion of the text from different perspectives. The primary aim is to supplement ideas to support the concept of the remaking of man without losing his fundamental values.

The main purpose of this work is to understand and interpret the philosophical content of the text and put it in perspective with the philosophical position of the early Madhyamikas. An English translation of the Sanskrit original edited from the Tibetan text is given in the appendix. I must admit that the translation is deficient in many respects, though care is taken to find the most appropriate meaning by taking into account the variant reading, etc. the emphasis of discussion is to get a rational understanding of the notion of dharma-nairatmya elucidated in the canonical texts and the explanation given by early Madhyamikas. The explanations relating to pudgala-nairatmya is basically from the Cittavisuddhi-prakarana, together with the Tantric spiritual practices.

I wish to take the opportunity to acknowledge the help and support I had received during the research and preparation of the manuscript, without which I would not be in a position to complete this work. In the course of my research by the way of identifying the text, translating it, reading, and correcting the manuscript, this work is immensely indebted to Prof. Godabarisha Mishra of the Department of Philosophy, Madras University. I also wish to express my gratitude to the Department of Philosophy, Madras University where I completed my PhD: the head of the Department Prof. R. Gopalakrishnan, Prof. S. Paneerselvam, and the staff and fellow scholars for having given me valuable support and assistance. I am also thankful to the staff members and authorities of the Adyar Library and Research Centre for extending necessary help to find the published original manuscript and the edited version of the text Cittavisuddhi-prakarana, and also for finding me many other books.

I express my sincere gratitude to Prof. M. Narasimhachary, who went through the text and gave valuable suggestions. I am extremely grateful to Dr. K. Sasidhar for his friendship together with supports such as, patiently reading through the manuscript, discussion; to Prof. N.S. Sadagopan, for correcting the translation of the text; to Dr R. Narasimhan, Lecturer in Sanskrit, University of madras, for helping me prepare the first translation of the text; to Mr. R. Mukundan for typing the Sanskrit manuscript.

I wish to acknowledge and extend special thanks to Mr. Noriyasu Kaitoku for his generous financial support and special interest shown to this work. My grateful thanks is due to Prof. Frank J. Hoffman, West Chester University, USA, for the financial support in offering the "Hoffman Shield" and the interest he has shown in the progress of this work.

I am extremely thankful to my wife Dr Yuko Fukuroi, for actively involving with this work and for extending unstinting encouragement and support all throughout the research. To my parents, Mrs Thrisiamma and Mr. Varghese Mittathani for allowing me to live the way I preferred, teaching me to appreciate human values and companionship, and inculcating the basics of free thinking, I am deeply indebted. I wish to extend a word of thanks to Prof. Koichi Furusaka of Osaka, Prof. Kazushige Sagawa, Mrs Sachiko, and Mr. Mizugu Fukuroi of Tokyo for all the help and support they have given me.

My extreme gratitude to Prof. Sengaku Mayeda, Prof. Emeritus, University of Tokyo, and Executive Director of Eastern Institute, Tokyo, for all his encouragement and support to me and also for writing an appropriate Foreword.

I am grateful to Ashok Jain and the late Devendra Jain of Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers, for showing interest in this work and publishing it.

Foreword

This book is based on a textual study of a Buddhist treatise entitled Cittavisuddhi-prakarana of Aryadeva probably in the third century AD. It is not a direct commentary on the text but it tries to find the philosophical foundations of the discussion of the text based on the position of the early Madhyamika philosophy of Nagarjuna and his disciple Aryadeva.

In this book, Dr Varghese gives an excellent insight into the principle of Buddhist Tantra on the basis of Madhyamika philosophy. I find that the arguments given here are worth noticing as it tries to discern the conception of sunyata from the perspective of Madhyamika philosophy and connect it with the conception of Tantric meditative practices.

Aryadeva's Cittavisuddhi-prakarana is very specific in saying that the conception of sunyata is complete only with a proper understanding of the inessentialness of the phenomenal world and possible only by the deconstruction of the notion of a self that eternally exists as the basis of human experience. This deconstruction is effectively possible only through Tantric from of meditation.

It is both, an honour and a pleasure for me to introduce this revised version of Dr Varghese's Doctoral dissertation to the world of specialists in Buddhism, especially the Madhyamika philosophy, and to the larger world of students of philosophy.

Contents

Forewordxiii
Prefacexv
CHAPTER ONE
INTRODUCTION
1
1.1The Knowing-Subject and the Objects Known 6
1.2The Madhyamika View-Its Origin and Development 8
1.2.1Early Madhyamikas and Their Contribution 9
1.2.2Madhyamika Dialectics-Rejection of the Theoretical Evaluation of Phenomena 12
1.3Pudgala-nairatmya through Tantrism 16
1.4Aryadeva-the Person and the Philosopher 18
1.4.1Aryadeva II and the Authorship of the Cittavisuddhi-prakarana 20
1.5A Review of Other Works of Aryadeva 24
1.5.1The Catuhsataka 24
1.5.2The Aksarasatakam 27
1.5.3The Hastavalanama-prakaranavrtti 27
1.6Cittavisuddhi-prakarana-Introducing Tantrism in Madhyamika 29
1.7About the Text 33
CHAPTER TWO
STRUCTURE OF MADHYAMIKA DIALECTICS
42
2.1Dialectics as a Method to Discern Dharma-nairatmya 42
2.2Buddha's Silence-the Source of Madhyamika Dialectics 24
2.3The Development of Madhyamika Dialectics 45
2.4Dharma-nairatmya-Through the Method of Regressive Analysis 48
2.4.1Discerning Dharma and Dharmadhatu-On Authority of Pramanas 49
2.4.2Examining Truth Function of the Pramanas-the Concept of Dharma-nairatmya 52
2.5Dharma-nairatmya-Through the Method of Progressive Analysis 62
2.6 "Uncertainty Principle" of Werner Heisenberg-Proof of Dharma-nairatmya66
2.7Sunyata as a Took to Restructure the Phenomena (Dharma) 71
2.8The Characteristic Features of Madhyamika Dialectics 74
2.8.1The Relevance of Negative Argumentation 76
2.9Madhyamika Dialectics-from Sanjaya to Nagarjuna 77
2.10Conclusion 80
CHAPTER THREE
DHARMADHATU-A RATIONAL RECONSTRUCTION OF "PHENOMENON"
88
3.1The Rational Structuring of Dharma-nairatmya and Dharmadhatu88
3.2Cittavisuddhi for Realisation of Pudgala-nairatmya and the Experience of Dharma-nairatmya91
3.3The Materialists' View on Pudgala-nairatmya 92
3.3.1Silencing of the Mind-Spiritual Practices of the Ucchedavadins 93
3.4Aryadeva's Refutation-the Catuskoti to solve Avyakrta Problems94
3.4.1Controlling the Thought Process-not Absolute Silencing of the Mind 95
3.5Realisation of the Eternal Self Brahmanical View96
3.5.1Sankhya School-Philosophisation inspired by the Vedas 98
3.5.2Sankhya and Yoga-Understanding of Cittavisuddhi 99
3.6The Importance of Middle Way in Spiritual Practice 102
3.7Phenomenal World and Means of Liberation 103
3.7.1The Arising of Suffering (Duhkha-samudaya) 104
3.7.2Cessation of Suffering (Dukhha-nirodha) 105
3.7.3The Means of Cessation of Suffering (Duhkha-nirodhagamini-patipada) 107
3.8Cessation of Suffering and Freedom through Budhicitta 108
3.8.1Bodhicitta through Sexuality and Martial Arts 112
3.8.2Other Important Spiritual Practices 114
3.9Bodhicitta-the Middle of Adherence and Aversion 114
3.10Bodhicitta-Removal of Vikalpas and Realization of Dharmadhatu116
3.11The Dharmadhatu 121
CHAPTER FOUR
THE INTERSECTION OF TANTRA AND
MADHYAMIKA PHILOSOPHY
127
4.1The Philosophical Significance of Prajna 127
4.1.1Theravada and Mahayana Views on Prajna 129
4.1.2Buddhi and Prajna to Understand the Nature of Phenomena 130
4.2Conception of Duality as Karuna and Sunyata 131
4.2.1Spiritual Dimension of Dharmadhatu 132
4.2.2Optimum Intermingling of Prajna and Upaya 133
4.2.3The Bodhisattva's Mind 135
4.3 Importance of Cittavisuddhi136
4.3.1Purvamimamsa View on Physical Purity 137
4.3.2Dharma (Spiritual Virtue) through rituals-the Difficulties 138
4.3.3Cittavisuddhi and Removal of the Notion of the Eternal Self 141
4.4The Vastness of Phenomenon and the Idea of Sunyata 143
4.4.1 Knowing Sunyata through Perfected Knowledge144
4.4.2Realising Selflessness through Tantric Practices 145
4.4.3The Personality of a Bodhisattva 147
4.5Referential Importance of Textual Injunctions 149
4.6The Vehemence of Prajna to remove Misconceptions 150
4.6.1Removal of Suffering with the Realization of Dharmadhatu 151
4.7Significance of the Mantras to protect Bodhicitta153
4.7.1Sexo-yogic (Kriyatantra) Spiritual Practices and Transcendence of Dualism 154
4.8Not Destruction of Desires but Appeasement of Desire 156
4.9Realising Pudgala-nairatmya through Tantric Practices 157
4.9.1The Removal of Ignorance clears the Notion of Permanent Self 158
4.9.2The Removal of Permanent Self with the Permanent Self 158
4.9.3The Yogic Practices that facilitate the Mastery of Mantras160
4.10Right Concentration (Sraddha) as the Supreme Upaya162
CHAPTER FIVE
CITTAVISUDDHI-A PRACTICAL METHOD FOR
PHILOSOPHICAL REALIZATION
170
5.1The Object of Experience 170
5.1.1The Truth-Value of the Cognised Objects 171
5.2Phenomena and the Psychophysical Personality 172
5.2.1The Importance of Dispositions 174
5.3The Dialectical Restructuring of Phenomena-Aryadeva's View 175
5.3.1Dialectical Analysis of Phenomena Philosophical Methodology of Early Madhyamikas 178
5.3.2Meaning of Sunyata-Some New Perspectives 181
5.4Dharmadhatu-The Elemental Composition of the Cognized Objects 182
5.4.1Aryadeva's View on Dharmadhatu and Dharma-nairatmya 185
5.5Cittavisuddhi, Dharmadhatu, and the Tantric Spiritual Techniques 188
CHAPTER SIX
TANTRIC INDOCTRINATION AND ESOTERIC PRACTICES-ETHICAL DIMENSION OF CITTAVISUDDHI-PRAKARANA
192
6.1Cittavisuddhi and the Conception of Yuganaddha 192
6.2The Dualism of Masculinity and Femininity 193
6.2.1The Subtle Dynamics of Mind 194
6.2.2The Bio-dynamics of Sexuality and the Dispositions 195
6.3The Transcendence of Dualism: The Tantric Way 196
6.3.1 Martial Art as a Tantric Discipline198
6.4Bodhidharma and the Indian Tradition of Martial Arts 201
6.5The Tantric Spiritual Practices of Cittavisuddhi-prakarana 202
6.6Pudgala-nairatmya (Essencelessnees of the Self) as the Manifestation of God 209
CHAPTER SEVEN
SUNYATA AND TANTRA: THE INNATE RELATIONSHIP
212
Appendix: The Cittavisuddhi-prakarana (of Aryadeva) with Sanskrit Text and English Translation226
Bibliography 263
Index 271
Displaying 246 of 1403      Previous | Next

Customer Comments

Post a Comment
 
 

Post Review
My Gallery
You can keep adding items you like to this gallery as a Wish List. If you Sign In we will remember your Gallery for your future reuse.
Delete | Add to Cart
Sign In | Register to save to My Gallery
Related Links
Related Items

ssl certificates
TRUSTe online privacy certification
We accept PayPal  VISA  MasterCard  Discover  American Express
Site Powered by www.unlimitedfx.com