Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > History > Architecture > Cinemas of South India: Culture, Resistance, Ideology
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Cinemas of South India: Culture, Resistance, Ideology
Cinemas of South India: Culture, Resistance, Ideology
Description
From the Jacket

With about 800 films per year, India is the leading producer of filmed entertainment in the world. Interestingly, the Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, and Malayalam film industries – the major four in south India – make up over half the share. This collection of diverse but interconnected essays provides a fresh approach to understanding cinemas of south India.

Considering cinema from various language cultures, this volume discusses issues ranging from identity politics and minority discourse to remakes and the politics of gender. The focus is to connect ideologies within varied traditions of films to ideas and images related to language, identity, gender, communities, and politics. The essays look at culture in terms of conventional and transforming norms of societal politics, and more importantly in terms of cultures of cinema; of production, viewing, stardom, and film songs, among others.

Sowmya Dechamma C.C. is Assistant Professor, Centre for Comparative Literature, University of Hyderabad.

Elavarthi Sathya Prakash is Assistant Professor, Department of Communication, University of Hyderabad.

Introduction

in this town where the world of men and women existed side by side but separately, it was said that a circus had once come. It was said that even a drama company had been there. But no one was able to say how many women had seen them. Perhaps, they had seen the play. If one of the men in the house had growled that the circus was not meant for women, they would have cowered under the voice.

But for the past few years, a tent came every six months and set itself up in the town. Films which had finished going around every town and were drawing their last breath came to this tent. With the arrival of this tent, the situation of the women may have eased a little, but we can only guess how much. For they had to depend on the men to go to the tent. If the men were in a good mood, they would escort the women to the cinema. Since the women themselves did not want to go out alone, they did not even imagine how they could be in the street without male company. The men took them to the tent, bought the tickets, had them torn at the women’s entrance, took care that they sat down properly, and then brought them home after the film was over.

If one asked how it was that the women labourers who sat in the fronton a mat came there by themselves, and cried and laughed with abandon, one might get this answer: ‘Those creatures? They have no bridle or rein!’ So it meant that only those women loved that which seemed unbridled. But when the scene of Hanuman leaping to Lanka was shown, awe and fascination was felt by all of them sitting there.

The news that the films to come were going to have speech and music had reached the town. Be that as it may, this peaceful and disciplined town shook a little, and the women began to stand on their own legs, when the axe cut into the huge trunk of the deodar tree in the middle of the town. This axe blow, we might say, created a small revolution in the world of the town’s women. Thought the wave arose in a teacup, it was wave nevertheless!

Content

Acknowledgements vii
Introduction: Elavarthi Sathya Prakash and Sowmya Dechamma C.C. ix
Part I – Far from Politices? Questioning the Cinematic
1. Cinema as a Site of Nationalist Identity Politics in Karnataka: M. Madhava Prasad3
2. What is Left of Malayalam Cinema?: Ratheesh Radhakrishnan 25
Part II – The Other Hero: Performance and Negotiation
3. Gender and the Filmic Remake – Nikhila H. 51
4. Contesting the Modern: Sreenivasan and Cintavishtayaye Shyamala Shyma P. 78
5. Dualities and Negotiation: 23rd Imsai Arasan Pulikesi Jananie Kalyanaraman 96
Part III – Of Languages, Cinema, and Identity
6. Film Market and the Telugu Nation: S.V. Srinivas117
7. Telugu Identity, Tamil Cinema, and Cultural Politics: Elavarthi Sathya Prakash 138
8. Visualizing Kannada in the Context of Postmodernity and Postcoloniality: Tharakeshwar V.B. 158
Part IV: Is ‘Local’ Local?; Or Grand and Local Meanings
9. Beyond ‘Bollywood’; Interpreting Indian Regional Cinema: M.K. Raghavendra 173
10. Is There a Kodava Cinema: Sowmya Dechamma C.C. 190
Notes of Contributors 127

Cinemas of South India: Culture, Resistance, Ideology

Item Code:
NAC439
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2010
ISBN:
019806795X
Size:
9.0 Inch X 5.8 Inch
Pages:
246
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 440 gms
Price:
$36.00   Shipping Free
Usually ships in 15 days
Be the first to rate this product
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Cinemas of South India: Culture, Resistance, Ideology
From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 8149 times since 10th Oct, 2011
From the Jacket

With about 800 films per year, India is the leading producer of filmed entertainment in the world. Interestingly, the Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, and Malayalam film industries – the major four in south India – make up over half the share. This collection of diverse but interconnected essays provides a fresh approach to understanding cinemas of south India.

Considering cinema from various language cultures, this volume discusses issues ranging from identity politics and minority discourse to remakes and the politics of gender. The focus is to connect ideologies within varied traditions of films to ideas and images related to language, identity, gender, communities, and politics. The essays look at culture in terms of conventional and transforming norms of societal politics, and more importantly in terms of cultures of cinema; of production, viewing, stardom, and film songs, among others.

Sowmya Dechamma C.C. is Assistant Professor, Centre for Comparative Literature, University of Hyderabad.

Elavarthi Sathya Prakash is Assistant Professor, Department of Communication, University of Hyderabad.

Introduction

in this town where the world of men and women existed side by side but separately, it was said that a circus had once come. It was said that even a drama company had been there. But no one was able to say how many women had seen them. Perhaps, they had seen the play. If one of the men in the house had growled that the circus was not meant for women, they would have cowered under the voice.

But for the past few years, a tent came every six months and set itself up in the town. Films which had finished going around every town and were drawing their last breath came to this tent. With the arrival of this tent, the situation of the women may have eased a little, but we can only guess how much. For they had to depend on the men to go to the tent. If the men were in a good mood, they would escort the women to the cinema. Since the women themselves did not want to go out alone, they did not even imagine how they could be in the street without male company. The men took them to the tent, bought the tickets, had them torn at the women’s entrance, took care that they sat down properly, and then brought them home after the film was over.

If one asked how it was that the women labourers who sat in the fronton a mat came there by themselves, and cried and laughed with abandon, one might get this answer: ‘Those creatures? They have no bridle or rein!’ So it meant that only those women loved that which seemed unbridled. But when the scene of Hanuman leaping to Lanka was shown, awe and fascination was felt by all of them sitting there.

The news that the films to come were going to have speech and music had reached the town. Be that as it may, this peaceful and disciplined town shook a little, and the women began to stand on their own legs, when the axe cut into the huge trunk of the deodar tree in the middle of the town. This axe blow, we might say, created a small revolution in the world of the town’s women. Thought the wave arose in a teacup, it was wave nevertheless!

Content

Acknowledgements vii
Introduction: Elavarthi Sathya Prakash and Sowmya Dechamma C.C. ix
Part I – Far from Politices? Questioning the Cinematic
1. Cinema as a Site of Nationalist Identity Politics in Karnataka: M. Madhava Prasad3
2. What is Left of Malayalam Cinema?: Ratheesh Radhakrishnan 25
Part II – The Other Hero: Performance and Negotiation
3. Gender and the Filmic Remake – Nikhila H. 51
4. Contesting the Modern: Sreenivasan and Cintavishtayaye Shyamala Shyma P. 78
5. Dualities and Negotiation: 23rd Imsai Arasan Pulikesi Jananie Kalyanaraman 96
Part III – Of Languages, Cinema, and Identity
6. Film Market and the Telugu Nation: S.V. Srinivas117
7. Telugu Identity, Tamil Cinema, and Cultural Politics: Elavarthi Sathya Prakash 138
8. Visualizing Kannada in the Context of Postmodernity and Postcoloniality: Tharakeshwar V.B. 158
Part IV: Is ‘Local’ Local?; Or Grand and Local Meanings
9. Beyond ‘Bollywood’; Interpreting Indian Regional Cinema: M.K. Raghavendra 173
10. Is There a Kodava Cinema: Sowmya Dechamma C.C. 190
Notes of Contributors 127
Post a Comment
 
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to Cinemas of South India: Culture, Resistance, Ideology (History | Books)

Anuranan: A Resonance
Aniruddha Roy Chowdhury
Shemaroo Entertainment Pvt.Ltd.(2007)
Approx. 114 Minutes
Item Code: IZZ371
$35.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Indian Cinema Through The Century
Item Code: NAK961
$36.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Light of Asia (Indian Silent Cinema 1912-1934)
by Suresh Chabria
Hardcover (Edition: 2013)
Niyogi Books
Item Code: NAG799
$36.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Indian Cinema Through The Century
Deal 20% Off
Item Code: NAK774
$36.00$28.80
You save: $7.20 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
CITY FLICKS: Indian Cinema and the Urban Experience
by Edited By: Preben Kaarsholm
Paperback (Edition: 2004)
Seagull Books
Item Code: IDE855
$32.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Yash Chopra: Fifty years in Indian cinema
Item Code: IDE843
$33.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Making Meaning in Indian Cinema
Item Code: IDE903
$24.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Cine-politics (Film Stars and Political Existence in South India)
by M. Madhava Prasad
Hardcover (Edition: 2014)
Orient Blackswan Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAG005
$36.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Filming Horror (Hindi Cinema, Ghosts and Ideologies)
Item Code: NAM265
$36.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Megastar (Chiranjeevi and Telugu Cinema After N.T. Rama Rao)
Item Code: IHL259
$43.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Hindi Cinema (An Insider’s View)
by Anil Saari
Hardcover (Edition: 2009)
Oxford University Press, New Delhi
Item Code: IDC346
$32.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
Thank you so much. Your service is amazing. 
Kiran, USA
I received the two books today from my order. The package was intact, and the books arrived in excellent condition. Thank you very much and hope you have a great day. Stay safe, stay healthy,
Smitha, USA
Over the years, I have purchased several statues, wooden, bronze and brass, from Exotic India. The artists have shown exquisite attention to details. These deities are truly awe-inspiring. I have been very pleased with the purchases.
Heramba, USA
The Green Tara that I ordered on 10/12 arrived today.  I am very pleased with it.
William USA
Excellent!!! Excellent!!!
Fotis, Greece
Amazing how fast your order arrived, beautifully packed, just as described.  Thank you very much !
Verena, UK
I just received my package. It was just on time. I truly appreciate all your work Exotic India. The packaging is excellent. I love all my 3 orders. Admire the craftsmanship in all 3 orders. Thanks so much.
Rajalakshmi, USA
Your books arrived in good order and I am very pleased.
Christine, the Netherlands
Thank you very much for the Shri Yantra with Navaratna which has arrived here safely. I noticed that you seem to have had some difficulty in posting it so thank you...Posting anything these days is difficult because the ordinary postal services are either closed or functioning weakly.   I wish the best to Exotic India which is an excellent company...
Mary, Australia
Love your website and the emails
John, USA
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2020 © Exotic India