Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Language and Literature > Panini > Ellipsis and Syntactic Overlapping: Current Issues in Paninian Syntactic Theory (An Old and Rare Book)
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Ellipsis and Syntactic Overlapping: Current Issues in Paninian Syntactic Theory (An Old and Rare Book)
Pages from the book
Ellipsis and Syntactic Overlapping: Current Issues in Paninian Syntactic Theory (An Old and Rare Book)
Look Inside the Book
Description

Foreword

 

It was, indeed, a special pleasure for us to have had Professor Madhav M. Deshpande to deliver the “Pandit Shripad Shastri Deodhar Memorial Lectures” (second series). We claim Professor Deshpande to be essentially a Poona product. After a brilliant career at Poona, Deshpande went over to the Pennsyl- vania University, U. S. A., for further training. In course of time, he was appointed Professor of Sanskrit and Linguistics in the University of Michigan. We have watched his remarkable progress with great personal interest and have heartily rejoiced over it.

 

Professor Deshpande’s output during these few years has been rich and varied. One of his earlier writings dealt with the concept of dialect in. the Paninian grammatical, tradition. In another early paper, he undertook a historical investigation of the Paninian procedure of taparakaran,a. Among his other contributions to the Paninian studies may be mentioned his papers, “The scope of homogeneous representation in. Panini in which he discusses the Sivasutras, “Panini and the Vedic evidence” in which he points out that Panini has made a clear distinction between the use of the varieties of past tense in the early Sainhitas and their use in his own current Sanskrit which is very close to the, prose of the Brahmanas, and “Linguistic presuppositions of Panini 8. 3. 26-27 “ in which he has shown that, very much like the current pronunciation of Sanskrit, the pronunciation of Sanskrit in Panini’s days was influenced by the vernacular languages, e.g. Prakrits, and his monograph on Savarnya. Writing on Rk-Pratisakhya 13.5-6, Deshpande clarifies the distinction between the notions of nada (=glottal resonance) and qhoea (=oral resonance). Elsewhere he deals with the phonetics of v and short a. His interest in Sanskrit phonetics is further confirmed by his announcement regarding the proposed critical edition of the Saunakiya Caturadhyayika for which he has already collected H manuscripts.

 

Professor Deshpande’s contributions to sociolinguistics are particularly original. I still vividly remember his paper on the genesis of the Rgvedic retroflexion in which he has argued that, in the case of Sanskrit, the origin of retroflexion lies not so much in the Aryans’ borrowing this trait from the Dravidians in early times as in the Dravidians’ adopting Aryan speech to their native phonology. In this very context I may mention Deshpande’s two monographs; Sociolinguistic Attitudes in India: An Historical Reconstruction and Evolution of 8yntactic Theory in Sanskrit Grammar, and two papers, “Some aspects of prehistoric Indo-Aryan” and “History, change and permanence: a classical Indian perspective”.

 

But let me not go on in this bibliographical strain. For, all that] had wanted to do was to prepare, if possible, a suitable background for Deshpande’s lectures. Actually, however, Professor Deshpande hardly needs any introduction to an audience of students and teachers of Sanskrit.

 

Incidentally, I should like to refer to an interesting coincideuce. The first series of the “Pandit Shripad Shastri Deodhar Memorial Lectures” was delivered by Deshpande’s teacher Professor Cardona.

 

Preface

 

I wish to express my deep gratitude to Professor R. N. Dandekar and the Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute for having invited me to deliver the “Pandit Shripad Shastri Deodhar Memorial Lectures” in June 1985. This gave me a valuable opportunity to present my recent researches in Paninian syntax before the learned audience of scholars in Poona. I hope that the publication of these lectures will lead to a further interest in exploring the unexplored treasures of the field of Paninian syntax and its interpretation and evaluation in relation to facts of Indian linguistic history on the one hand, and the evolving theories of modern linguistics on the other.

 

In the course of these lectures, occasionally I had to disagree with the conclusions of the previous work in this area by Professor Paul Kiparsky and Professor S.D. Joshi. Such inevitable disagreements in the course of an honest and free discussion of a difficult subject in no way reflect a lack of respect on my part for these scholars and their work. On the contrary, their work inspired me to undertake a re-examination of the concepts of ellipsis and syntactic overlapping in Panini, a task which could not have been carried out without the foundation laid by these and other scholars.

 

In developing ideas presented in these lectures, I was greatly assisted by the enthusiasm of my student Ms, Elena Bashir, with whom I had many long discussions and who read previous drafts of these lectures and made valuable suggestions. I am also indebted to Professor Peter E. Hook of the University of Michigan and Professor Richard Salomon of the University of Washington for their constructive criticism. I am also grateful for the suggestions made by various scholars in the audience at Poona. However, I must bear responsibility for the conclusions presented in these lectures. Last but not least, I must thank the College of Literature, Science and the Arts of the University of Michigan for providing funds which made it possible for me to travel to India to deliver these lectures.

 

Contents

 

 

Foreword

 

 

Preface

 

 

Lecture One

 

 

Ellipsis and Syntactic Overlapping in Panini: A Review of Current Ideas

1-32

1.

Introduction

11

2.

Equi-NP-Deletion in Transformational Grammar

2

3.

Kiparsky on Ellipsis in Panini

3

4.

Ellipsis versus Syntactic Overlapping

5

5.

S. D. Joshi on P. 3. 1. 87

7

6.

Critique of Joshi’s Position on P. 3. 1. 87

9

7.

S. D. Joshi on P. 1. 3. 67

16

8.

Critique of Joshi’s Position on P. 1. 3. 67

18

9.

S. D. Joshi on P. 1. 4. 52

21

10.

Critique of Joshi’s Position on P. 1. 4. 52

22

11.

On the Transformational Interpretation of Panini

23

12.

Re-examining the Notion of Ellipsis in Panini

26

13.

Ellipsis and Syntactic Overlapping: Complementary Principles in Panini

28

14.

Ellipsis and Syntactic Overlapping: Complementary Principles in Katyayana

30

 

Lecture Two

 

 

Natural Ellipsis and Prescribed Word-Deletion in Sanskrit Grammar

33-60

1.

Natural Ellipsis in Panini

33

2.

Equivalent Non-Elliptical Constructions in Panini

34

3.

Nature of Natural Ellipsis in Panini

35

4.

Prescribed Word-Deletion in panini

36

4.1.

The Ekasetp Procedure

37

4.1.1.

Obligatory “One Constituent Retention”

38

4.1.2.

Optional ,c One Constituent Retention”

39

4.2.

Prescribed, Word-Deletion in the Taddhita Section

39

4.2.1.

Obligatory Word-Deletion in a Taddhita  Formation

40

4.2.2.

Optional Word-Deletion in a Taddhita Formation

40

5.

“Stretched Semantic Links (?)”

41

6.

Natural Ellipsis and Prescribed Word-Deletion in Katyayana

42

6.1.

Natural Ellipsis in Katyayana

42

6.2

Equivalent Non-Elliptical Constructions in Katyayana

43

6.3.

Prescribed Word-Deletion in Katyayana (Based on Natural Ellipsis)

44

6.4.

Katyayana on Ekasesa

45

6. 5.

Katyayana on Word-Deletion in Taddhita Formations

45

6.6.

Katyayana’s Extension of Prescribed Word-Deletion to the Area of Compounds: An Original Contribution

47

6.6.1.

Katyayana on P. 2. 1. 34-35.

47

6.6.2.

Katyayana on P. 2. 1. 69.

48

6.6.3.

Katyayana on P. 2.2.24.

49

6.6.4.

Katyayana on P. 6. 2. 93.

50

6.6.5.

Katyayana on P. 6.3: 86.

51

6.7.

Katyayana’s Alternative Solution: Extended Semantics

51

6.8.

Katyayana and the Tradition of Saunagas

52

6.9.

Systemic Implications of the Prescribed Word- Deletion

54

6.10.

Other Deletion-Based Proposals of Katyayana

55

7.

Ellipsis and Prescribed Word-Deletion in Patanjali

57

7.1.

Natural Ellipsis in Patanjali

57

7.2.

Patafijali on Prescribed Word-Deletion

58

8.

Conclusion

59

 

Lecture Three

 

 

From Panini to His Successors: Theoretical and Historical Change

61-89

1.

General Issues

61

2.

Different Perspectives in Katyayana’s Varttikas

65

2.1.

Vacana-Pramanya: A Legalistic View

65

2.2.

Deletion-Based Derivation of Compounds

67

2.3.

The Saunaga Theory of Extended Semantics

68

2.4.

Natural Semantics?

68

3.

General Indications of a Changed Perception of Sanskrit

69

4.

Semantics of Sanskrit and the Evolution of Indo-Aryan Languages

73

5.

General Theoretical Implications of the Notions of Ellipsis and Syntactic Overlapping

82

6.

Conclusion

 

 

Bibliography

90-94

 

Sample Pages



Ellipsis and Syntactic Overlapping: Current Issues in Paninian Syntactic Theory (An Old and Rare Book)

Item Code:
NAJ822
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
1985
Language:
English
Size:
8.5 inch X 5.5 inch
Pages:
106
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 120 gms
Price:
$30.00   Shipping Free
Look Inside the Book
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Ellipsis and Syntactic Overlapping: Current Issues in Paninian Syntactic Theory (An Old and Rare Book)

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 3191 times since 21st Apr, 2018

Foreword

 

It was, indeed, a special pleasure for us to have had Professor Madhav M. Deshpande to deliver the “Pandit Shripad Shastri Deodhar Memorial Lectures” (second series). We claim Professor Deshpande to be essentially a Poona product. After a brilliant career at Poona, Deshpande went over to the Pennsyl- vania University, U. S. A., for further training. In course of time, he was appointed Professor of Sanskrit and Linguistics in the University of Michigan. We have watched his remarkable progress with great personal interest and have heartily rejoiced over it.

 

Professor Deshpande’s output during these few years has been rich and varied. One of his earlier writings dealt with the concept of dialect in. the Paninian grammatical, tradition. In another early paper, he undertook a historical investigation of the Paninian procedure of taparakaran,a. Among his other contributions to the Paninian studies may be mentioned his papers, “The scope of homogeneous representation in. Panini in which he discusses the Sivasutras, “Panini and the Vedic evidence” in which he points out that Panini has made a clear distinction between the use of the varieties of past tense in the early Sainhitas and their use in his own current Sanskrit which is very close to the, prose of the Brahmanas, and “Linguistic presuppositions of Panini 8. 3. 26-27 “ in which he has shown that, very much like the current pronunciation of Sanskrit, the pronunciation of Sanskrit in Panini’s days was influenced by the vernacular languages, e.g. Prakrits, and his monograph on Savarnya. Writing on Rk-Pratisakhya 13.5-6, Deshpande clarifies the distinction between the notions of nada (=glottal resonance) and qhoea (=oral resonance). Elsewhere he deals with the phonetics of v and short a. His interest in Sanskrit phonetics is further confirmed by his announcement regarding the proposed critical edition of the Saunakiya Caturadhyayika for which he has already collected H manuscripts.

 

Professor Deshpande’s contributions to sociolinguistics are particularly original. I still vividly remember his paper on the genesis of the Rgvedic retroflexion in which he has argued that, in the case of Sanskrit, the origin of retroflexion lies not so much in the Aryans’ borrowing this trait from the Dravidians in early times as in the Dravidians’ adopting Aryan speech to their native phonology. In this very context I may mention Deshpande’s two monographs; Sociolinguistic Attitudes in India: An Historical Reconstruction and Evolution of 8yntactic Theory in Sanskrit Grammar, and two papers, “Some aspects of prehistoric Indo-Aryan” and “History, change and permanence: a classical Indian perspective”.

 

But let me not go on in this bibliographical strain. For, all that] had wanted to do was to prepare, if possible, a suitable background for Deshpande’s lectures. Actually, however, Professor Deshpande hardly needs any introduction to an audience of students and teachers of Sanskrit.

 

Incidentally, I should like to refer to an interesting coincideuce. The first series of the “Pandit Shripad Shastri Deodhar Memorial Lectures” was delivered by Deshpande’s teacher Professor Cardona.

 

Preface

 

I wish to express my deep gratitude to Professor R. N. Dandekar and the Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute for having invited me to deliver the “Pandit Shripad Shastri Deodhar Memorial Lectures” in June 1985. This gave me a valuable opportunity to present my recent researches in Paninian syntax before the learned audience of scholars in Poona. I hope that the publication of these lectures will lead to a further interest in exploring the unexplored treasures of the field of Paninian syntax and its interpretation and evaluation in relation to facts of Indian linguistic history on the one hand, and the evolving theories of modern linguistics on the other.

 

In the course of these lectures, occasionally I had to disagree with the conclusions of the previous work in this area by Professor Paul Kiparsky and Professor S.D. Joshi. Such inevitable disagreements in the course of an honest and free discussion of a difficult subject in no way reflect a lack of respect on my part for these scholars and their work. On the contrary, their work inspired me to undertake a re-examination of the concepts of ellipsis and syntactic overlapping in Panini, a task which could not have been carried out without the foundation laid by these and other scholars.

 

In developing ideas presented in these lectures, I was greatly assisted by the enthusiasm of my student Ms, Elena Bashir, with whom I had many long discussions and who read previous drafts of these lectures and made valuable suggestions. I am also indebted to Professor Peter E. Hook of the University of Michigan and Professor Richard Salomon of the University of Washington for their constructive criticism. I am also grateful for the suggestions made by various scholars in the audience at Poona. However, I must bear responsibility for the conclusions presented in these lectures. Last but not least, I must thank the College of Literature, Science and the Arts of the University of Michigan for providing funds which made it possible for me to travel to India to deliver these lectures.

 

Contents

 

 

Foreword

 

 

Preface

 

 

Lecture One

 

 

Ellipsis and Syntactic Overlapping in Panini: A Review of Current Ideas

1-32

1.

Introduction

11

2.

Equi-NP-Deletion in Transformational Grammar

2

3.

Kiparsky on Ellipsis in Panini

3

4.

Ellipsis versus Syntactic Overlapping

5

5.

S. D. Joshi on P. 3. 1. 87

7

6.

Critique of Joshi’s Position on P. 3. 1. 87

9

7.

S. D. Joshi on P. 1. 3. 67

16

8.

Critique of Joshi’s Position on P. 1. 3. 67

18

9.

S. D. Joshi on P. 1. 4. 52

21

10.

Critique of Joshi’s Position on P. 1. 4. 52

22

11.

On the Transformational Interpretation of Panini

23

12.

Re-examining the Notion of Ellipsis in Panini

26

13.

Ellipsis and Syntactic Overlapping: Complementary Principles in Panini

28

14.

Ellipsis and Syntactic Overlapping: Complementary Principles in Katyayana

30

 

Lecture Two

 

 

Natural Ellipsis and Prescribed Word-Deletion in Sanskrit Grammar

33-60

1.

Natural Ellipsis in Panini

33

2.

Equivalent Non-Elliptical Constructions in Panini

34

3.

Nature of Natural Ellipsis in Panini

35

4.

Prescribed Word-Deletion in panini

36

4.1.

The Ekasetp Procedure

37

4.1.1.

Obligatory “One Constituent Retention”

38

4.1.2.

Optional ,c One Constituent Retention”

39

4.2.

Prescribed, Word-Deletion in the Taddhita Section

39

4.2.1.

Obligatory Word-Deletion in a Taddhita  Formation

40

4.2.2.

Optional Word-Deletion in a Taddhita Formation

40

5.

“Stretched Semantic Links (?)”

41

6.

Natural Ellipsis and Prescribed Word-Deletion in Katyayana

42

6.1.

Natural Ellipsis in Katyayana

42

6.2

Equivalent Non-Elliptical Constructions in Katyayana

43

6.3.

Prescribed Word-Deletion in Katyayana (Based on Natural Ellipsis)

44

6.4.

Katyayana on Ekasesa

45

6. 5.

Katyayana on Word-Deletion in Taddhita Formations

45

6.6.

Katyayana’s Extension of Prescribed Word-Deletion to the Area of Compounds: An Original Contribution

47

6.6.1.

Katyayana on P. 2. 1. 34-35.

47

6.6.2.

Katyayana on P. 2. 1. 69.

48

6.6.3.

Katyayana on P. 2.2.24.

49

6.6.4.

Katyayana on P. 6. 2. 93.

50

6.6.5.

Katyayana on P. 6.3: 86.

51

6.7.

Katyayana’s Alternative Solution: Extended Semantics

51

6.8.

Katyayana and the Tradition of Saunagas

52

6.9.

Systemic Implications of the Prescribed Word- Deletion

54

6.10.

Other Deletion-Based Proposals of Katyayana

55

7.

Ellipsis and Prescribed Word-Deletion in Patanjali

57

7.1.

Natural Ellipsis in Patanjali

57

7.2.

Patafijali on Prescribed Word-Deletion

58

8.

Conclusion

59

 

Lecture Three

 

 

From Panini to His Successors: Theoretical and Historical Change

61-89

1.

General Issues

61

2.

Different Perspectives in Katyayana’s Varttikas

65

2.1.

Vacana-Pramanya: A Legalistic View

65

2.2.

Deletion-Based Derivation of Compounds

67

2.3.

The Saunaga Theory of Extended Semantics

68

2.4.

Natural Semantics?

68

3.

General Indications of a Changed Perception of Sanskrit

69

4.

Semantics of Sanskrit and the Evolution of Indo-Aryan Languages

73

5.

General Theoretical Implications of the Notions of Ellipsis and Syntactic Overlapping

82

6.

Conclusion

 

 

Bibliography

90-94

 

Sample Pages



Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to Ellipsis and Syntactic Overlapping: Current Issues in Paninian... (Language and Literature | Books)

The Ashtadhyayi of Panini: 2 Volumes
Item Code: IDE732
$225.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Some Theoretical Problems In Panini’s Grammar: A Rare Book
Deal 20% Off
Item Code: NAD652
$25.00$20.00
You save: $5.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Astadhyayi of Panini (Volume II - Adhyaya One
Item Code: ISL05
$75.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Panini His Place in Sanskrit Literature
Item Code: NAD700
$30.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Arrangement of the Rules in Panini's Astadhyayi
by K.R. Tripathi
Hardcover (Edition: 2016)
Parimal Publication Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDH555
$22.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
Awesome books collection. lots of knowledge available on this website
Pankaj, USA
Very easy to do business with your company.
Paul Gomez, USA
Love you great selection of products including books and art. Of great help to me in my research.
William, USA
Thank you for your beautiful collection.
Mary, USA
As if i suddenly discovered a beautiful glade after an exhausting walk in a dense forest! That's how i feel, incredible ExoticIndia !!!
Fotis, Greece
Each time I do a command I'm very satisfy.
Jean-Patrick, Canada
Very fast and straight forward.
Elaine, New Zealand
Good service.
Christine, Taiwan.
I received my Manjushri statue today and I can't put in words how delighted I am with it! Thank you very much. It didn't take very long to get here (the UK) - I wasn't expecting it for a few more weeks. Your support team is very good at providing customer service, too. I must conclude that you have an excellent company.
Mark, UK.
A very comprehensive site for a company with a good reputation.
Robert, UK
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2019 © Exotic India