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Books > Language and Literature > The Katha Sarit Sagara: The Ocean of the Streams of Story – 2 Volumes (Translated from the Original Sanskrit)
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The Katha Sarit Sagara: The Ocean of the Streams of Story – 2 Volumes (Translated from the Original Sanskrit)
The Katha Sarit Sagara: The Ocean of the Streams of Story – 2 Volumes (Translated from the Original Sanskrit)
Description
A Few Thoughts on the Katha Sarit Sagara

It is not only pleasure but great honour to write on this remarkable work of the genius of India's people. Thought known or very long time and being a subject for researches of quite a few scholars the Kathasaritsagara still stays as one of the most difficult riddles in the history of early mediaeval literature of the people of India. Somadeva's work itself is a symbol of continuity of literary process in India, as it stems from the rather mysterious Brihat Katha of Gunadhya. Materials concerning Brihat Katha and its later versions are pretty well known. One may refer to find them in famous works of A. B. Keith, M. Winternitz, F. Lacote, S. K. De and many others.

The Kathasaritsagara was translated a number of times in European languages in portions but so far there was only one translation whole work and this is famous translation by C. H. Tawney originally published by Asiatic Society of Bengal and later edited with extensive notes and comments by N. M. Penzer. Both editions are or a long time out of print and became a real bibliographical rarity. Quite a long time necessity of new edition was felt and Messrs Munshiram Manoharlal have to be congratulated and thanked by every indologist and connoisseure of literature for bringing a new edition of C. H. Tawney's translation.

The latest decades have shown very rapid progress in research work almost in every field of Indology. But it has to be stated that certain traditions still are prevailing and some works of ancient and mediaeval authors still do not get attention they deserve, among them one may name the Kathasaritsagara. it goes without saying that works of H. Brokhaus, F. Lacote, N. M. Penzer and some other authors laid necessary foundations for further research, but since then the work which was done in different fields of Indology allows us to reassess importance of Somadeva's work and its meaning not only for indological research but also for contemporaneity. I would like to mark such an interesting undertaking as new publication of The Kathasaritsagara which was started by the Bihar Rashtra Bhasha Parishad, two volumes of which already have come out.

Indisputable is a magnificent contribution of people of India to the world culture and literature and research in this sphere, as well as acquaintance with achievements of Indian culture and literature enrich intellectual life of other peoples as well acquaintance with cultural heritage and contemporary culture and literature of other peoples enriches-intellectual world of an Indian. There is none most reliable media of such mutually beneficial cultural exchange and this media is translation.

There are different approaches to the problem of translation. One may prefer literal translation in which quality of art is hopelessly lost but certain appearance of "Scientific translation" comes in to the picture; another may prefer such method of translation which transfer the very subject and personae dramatis into alien surrounding or the "art's sake". There can be another method of translation, according which plot, style and imagery created by an author in atmosphere of his epoch, language and social environment are being transferred by a translator, belonging to another historical epoch, in atmosphere of his language, making ideas problems, values of life, imagery, style of a certain alien author, near and understandable to compatriots of a translator brings the best results. Though already more than eighty years passed since C. H. Tawney's translation was published it is still alive and quite readable because the translator followed above mentioned method.

Many attempts were done so far to find out historical authencity of some heroes and events in The Kathasaritsagara. But as well deal here with a work of art we are bound to have in view that life was reflected in this work not as in the mirror of history but through poet's imagery. The Kathasaritsagara deals not so much with concrete historical events but with problems and processes of life, not so much with concrete historical personalities but mostly with concrete types of people, specific to the time and country in which Somadeva lived. Kalhana was a historian, Somadeva was an artist. But as he in his remarkable work reflected life of his time we are in all earnest right to look for a real historical landscape in his work. We are very much helped by author himself who inspite of certain literary traditions, already canonized in his time selected the way of "Auchitya", the way of realistic imagery, so eloquently propounded by his predecessor famous poet and theoretician of literature Kshemendra "Auchitya Vichara Charcha" Concept of "Auchitya' the way of realistic imagery, so eloquently propounded by his predecessor famous poet and theoretician of literature Kshemendra "Auchitya Vichara Charcha". Concept of "Auchitya" was really bold attempt to put development of literature on the broad highway of realism. Of course, the narrative itself is centered around stories about Udayana and Naravahanadatta and has definitely airy tale-like mythological character, but within this frame we find wonderful pictures of every day life of the then India. Objection can be made that Somadeva himself said that he was true to his source-original text of Gunadhya's Brihat Brihat Katha. Here no contradiction exists-it is quite possible that he based himself on original text of Brihat Katha and while doing so Somadeva reflected in number of stories life of contemporary society. One of the most important contributions of Somadeva to the literature is that he collected and presented to us in his work more than 350 stories-fairy tales, novels, shortstories, fables anecdotes etc which were current among the people. He gave them brilliant form, with full sense of "Auchitya" and also the appropiate literary dress. In stories of Udayana and Naravahanadatta his style goes up to the heights of best examples of Mahakavya, in "Vetala Panchvinshati and "Panchatantra" his styles is very simple and lucid and in case of anecdotes it becomes some time even primitive. His mastery in style, imagery and plot was prepared by the whole preceding development of literatures of peoples of India, and in certain sense The Kathasaritsagara may be viewed as sum total of preceding development. From the literary point of view The Katha-sarit-sagara is real embodiment of the best achievements of the art of literature in early mediaeval India.

What was said above does not diminish works of Somadeva's predecessors Buddhaswamin and Kshemendra. They had put before themselves quite different aims. Buddhaswamin actually wrote a novel on Naravahanadatta and Kshemendra whole Brhatkathamanjari as it seems to me is underestimated as it was usually treated from point of view of fullness of his narrative. If we shall see Brhatkathamanjari in context of whole creative heritage of Kshemendra then we may come to correct assessment of his work.

Fifteen years will pass and we shall mark ninth centenary of the Kathasaritsagara. I allow myself to express hope that within this period new and new works on The Katha-sarit-sagra will appear, translations of this remarkable work of genius will come out in many other languages. Let the present publication of C. H. Tawney's translation become starting point for this work and let joint efforts of Indian Scholars and their colleagues in other countries contribute to disclosure of secrets of The Kathasaritsagara and to popularize it among the people.

CONTENTS
BOOK I.
CHAPTER I
Introduction1-5
Curse of Pushpadanta and Malyavan,4-5
CHAPTER II
Story of Pushpadanta when living on the earth as Vararuchi 5-10
How Kanabhuti became a Pisacha,6-7
Story of Vararuchi's teacher Varsha, and his fellow-pupils Vyadi and Indradatta,7-10
CHAPTER III
Continuation of the story of Vararuchi11-16
Story of the founding of the city of Pataliputra11-16
Story of king Brahmadatta,12-13
CHAPTER IV
Continuation of the story of Vararuchi,16-23
Story of Upakosa and her four lovers,17-20
CHAPTER V
Conclusion of the story of Vararuchi,23-31
Story of Sivasaraman,27-28
CHAPTER VI
Story of malyavan when living on the earth as Gunadhya32-40
Story of the Mouse-merchant,33-34
Story of the chanter of the Sama Veda34-35
Story of Satavahana,36-37
CHAPTER VII
Continuation of the story of Gunadhya,41-37
How Pashpadanta got this name,43-46
Story of king Sivi,45-46
CHAPTER VIII
Continuation of the story of Gunadhya,47-49
Siva's tales, originally composed by Gunadhtya in the Paisacha language, are made known in Sanskrit under the title of Vrihat Katha, 49
BOOK II.
CHAPTER IX
Story of the ancestors and parents of Udayana king of Vatsa,52-56
CHAPTER X
Continuation of the story of Udayana's parents,56-57
Story of Sridatta and Mrigankavati,56-66
Udayana succeeds to the kingdom of Vatsa,67
CHAPTER XI
Continuation of the story of Udayana,67-71
Story of king Chandamahasena,69-71
CHAPTER XII
Continuation of the story of Udayana,72-82
Story of Rupinika,76-82
CHAPTER XIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana,82-93
Story of Devasmita,85-92
Story of the cunning Siddhikari,87-88
Story of Saktimati,91-92
CHAPTER XIV
Continuation of the story of Udayana,94-98
Story of the clever Deformed child,96
Story of Ruru.97-98
BOOK III
CHAPTER XV
Continuation of the story of Udayana,101-109
Story of the clever physician,101-102
Story of the hypoctitical ascetic,102-104
Story of Unmadini,104-105
Story of the loving couple who died of separation,105-106
Story of Punyasena,106
Story of Sunda and Upasunda,108
Continuation of the story of Udayana109-115
Story of Kunti,110-111
CHAPTER XVII
Continuation of the story of Udayana,115-124
Story of Urvasi,115-117
Story of Vihitasena,117
Story of Somaprabha,118-122
Story of Ahalya,122-123
CHAPTER XVIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana,124-145
Story of Vidushaka,128-144
CHAPTER XIX
Continuation of the story of Udayana,145-152
Story of Devadasa,146-147
CHAPTER XX
Continuation of the story of Udayana152-164
Story of Phalabhuti,152-163
Story of Kuvalayavali and the witch Kalaratri,155-158
Story of the birth of Kartikeya,155-157
Story of Sundaraka and Kalaratri,158-161
BOOK IV
CHAPTER XXI
Continuation of the story of Udayana,165-173
Story of Pandu,166
Story of Devadatta168-170
Story of Pingalika,170-171
CHAPTER XXII
Continuation of the story of Udayana,173-186
Story of Jimutavahana174-186
Story of Jimutavahana's adventures in a former life,176-181
Story of Kadru and Vinata,182-183
CHAPTER XXIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana186-191
Story of Sinhaparakrama,188
Birth of Udayana's son Naravahanadatta,189
BOOK V
CHAPTER XXIV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,193-204
Story of Saktivega king of the Vidyadharas,194-204
Story of Siva and Madhava,197-202
Story of Harasvamin,203-204
CHAPTER XXV
Continuation of the story of Saktivega,205-219
Story of Asokadatta and Vijayadatta,208-219
CHAPTER XXVI
Conclusion of the story of Saktivega 220-233
Story of Devadatta,229-231
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,233
BOOK VI
CHAPTER XXVII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,235-246
Story of Kalingadatta, king of Takshasila,235-246
Story of the merchant's son in Takshasila236-238
Story of the Apsaras Surabhidatta,238-239
Story of king Dharmadatta and his wife Nagasri239-240
Story of the seven Brahmans who devoured a cow in time of famine,241
Story of the two ascetics, the one a Brahman, the other a Chandala,241-242
Story of king Vikramasinha and the two Brahmans,242-246
CHAPTER XXVIII
Continuation of the story of kalingadatta,246-257
Birth of his daughter Kalingasena,246
Story of the seven princesses,247-249
Story of the prince who tore out his own eye,247-248
Story of the ascetic who conquered anger,248-249
Story of Sulochana and Sushena,249-252
Story of the prince and the merchants son who saved his life,253-255
Story of the Brahman and the Pisacha,255-256
CHAPTER XXIX
Continuation of the story of Kalingadatta,257-267
CHAPTER XXX
Continuation of the story of Kalingadatta,267-274
Story of Tejasvati,270-271
Story of the Brahman Harisarman,272-274
Conclusion of the story of Kalingadatta,276-278
Kalingasena daughter of Kalingadatta escapes to Vatsa,278
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son278-280
CHAPTER XXXII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,281-291
Story of the Brahman's son Vishnudatta and his foolish companions283-285
Story of the king and the barber's wife,288-289
CHAPTER XXXIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,291-302
Story of Srutasena,292-295
Story of the three Brahman brothers,293
Story of Devasena and Unmadini,294
Story of the ichneumon, the owl, the cat the mouse,296-298
Story of king Prasenajit the owl, the Brahman who lost his treasure,298-299
CHAPTER XXXIV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,302-317
Story of king Indradatta,303
Story of the Yaksha Virupaksha,306-307
Story of Satrughna and his wicked wife,313-314
Story of king Harisinha,314
BOOK VII
CHAPTER XXXV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,319-327
Story of Ratnaprabha320-226
Story of Sattvasila and the two treasures,321-322
Story of the brave king Vikramatunga,322-323
CHAPTER XXXVI
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,328-334
Story of king Ratnadhipati and the white elephant Svetarasmi,328-334
Story of Yavanasena,331-332
CHAPTER XXXVII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,334-346
Story of Nischayadatta,334-346
Story of Somasvamin ,339-341
Story of Bhavasarman,342-343
CHAPTER XXXVIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,346-354
Story of king Vikramaditya and the hetaera,357-354
Story of king Vikramaditya and the treacherous mendicant,349-350
CHAPTER XXXIX
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,355-357
Story of Sringabhuja and the daughter of the Rakshasa,355-367
CHAPTER XL
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,369-375
Story of Tapodatta,370
Story of Virupasarman,371
Story of king Vilasasila and the physician Tarunachandra,372-375
CHAPTER XLI
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,376-379
Story of king Chirayus and his minister Nagarjuna,376-378
CHAPTER XLI
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,376-379
Story of king Chirayus and his minister Nagarjuna,376-378
CHAPTER XLII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,379-390
Story of king Prityagasena, his wicked wife, and his two sons,381-381
CHAPTER XLIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,390-403
Story of the two brothers Pranadhara and Rajyadhara,391-393
Story of Arthalobha and his beautiful wife,393-396
Story of the princess Karpurika in her birth as a swan,397-398
BOOK VIII
CHAPTER XLIV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,405-406
Story of Suryaprabha,406-414
CHAPTER XLV
Continuation of the story of Suryaprabha414-434
Story of the generous Danava Namuchi,444-446
CHAPTER XLVII
Continuation of the story of Suryaprabha,446-452
CHAPTER XLVIII
Continuation of the story of Suryaprabha,452-459
Adventure of the witch Sarabhanana,458
CHAPTER XLIX
Continuation of the story of Suryaprabha,459-471
Story of king Mahasena and his virtuous minister Gunasarman,459-471
CHAPTER L
Conclusion of the story of Suryaprabha,472-481
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,481
BOOK LX.
CHAPTER LI
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son483-494
Story of Alankaravati.484-485
Story of Rama and Sita,486-488
Story of the handsome king Prithvirupa,489-492
CHAPTER LII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son494-515
Story of Asokamala,496-498
Story of Sthulabhuja,497-498
Story of Anangarati and her four suitors,498-514
Story of Anangarati in a former birth,502-503
CHAPTER LIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,515-524
Story of king Lakshadatta and his dependent Labdhadatta,515-518
Story of the Brahman Viravara,519-524
Story of Suprabha,520-521
CHAPTER LIV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,524-537
Story of the merchant Samudrasura,529-531
Story of king Chamarabala,532-536
Story of Yasovarman and the two fortunes,532-535
CHAPTER LV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,537-549
Story of Chiradatri537-538
Story of king Kanakavarsha and Madanasundari,538-549
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son549-569
Story of the Brahman Chandrasvamin, his son Mahipala, and his daughter Chandravati,549-569
Story of Chakra,554-556
Story of the hermit and the faithful wife,556-557
Story of Dharmavyadha the righteous seller of flesh,557
Story of the treacherous Pasupata ascetic,558-559
Story of king Tribhuvana,558-559
Story of Nala and Damayanti,559-568
CONTENTS OF VOL. II.
BOOK X.
CHAPTER LVII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son1-10
Story of the porter who found a bracelet1-2
Story of the inexhaustible pitcher2-4
Story of the merchant's son, the hetaera and the wonderful ape Ala4-10
CHAPTER LVIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son10-17
Story of king Vikramasinha, the hetaera and the young Brahman11-13
Story of the faithless wife who burnt herself with her husband's body13-14
Story of the faithless wife who had her husband murdered14
Story of Vajrasara whose wife cut off his nose and ears14-16
Story of king Sinhabala and his faithless wife16-17
CHAPTER LIX
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son17-26
Story of king Sumanas, the Nishada maiden, and the learned parrot18-26
The parrot's account of his own life as a parrot19-21
The hermit's story of Somaprabha, Manorathaprabha, and Makarandika21-25
Episode of Manorathaprabha and Rasmimat22-23
CHAPTER LX
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son27-43
Story of Suravarman who spared his guilty wife27
Story of the ox abandoned in the forest, and the lion, and the two jackals27-43
Story of the monkey that pulled out the wedge28
Story of the jackal and the drum30
Story of the crane and the Makara31-32
Story of the lion and the hare32-33
Story of the louse and the flea34
Story of the lion, the panther, the crow and the jackal35-36
Story of the pair of titthibhas36-38
Story of the tortoise and the two swans37
Story of the three fish37-38
Story of the monkeys, the firefly and the bird39
Story of Dharmabuddhi and Dushtabuddhi40-41
Story of the crane, the snake, and the mungoose41
Story of the mice that ate an iron balance41-42
CHAPTER LXI
Continuation of the story Udayana and his son44-63
Story of the foolish merchant who made aloes-wood into charcoal44
Story of the Story of the man who sowed roasted seed44
Story of the man who mixed fire and water44
Story of the man who tried to improve his wife's nose45
Story of the foolish herdsman45
Story of the fool and the ornaments45
Story of the fool and the cotton45
Story of the foolish villagers who cut down the palm-trees46
Story of the treasure-finder who was blinded46
Story of the fool and the salt46-47
Story of the fool and his milch-cow47
Story of the foolish bald man and the fool who pelted him47
Story of the crow, and the king of the pigeons, the tortoise and the deer48-52
Story of the mouse and the hermit49-51
Story of the Brahman's wife and the sesame-seeds50-51
Story of the greedy jackal50
Story of the wife who falsely accused her husband of murdering a Bhilla53-54
Story of the snake who told his secret to a woman54-55
Story of the bald man and the hair-restorer55
Story of the foolish servant55
Story of the faithless wife who was present at her own S'raddha55-56
Story of the ambitious Chandala maiden56
Story of the miserly king57
Story of Dhavalamukha, his trading fried, and his fighting friend57-58
Story of the thirsty fool that did not drink58
Story of the fool who killed his son58
Story of the fool and his brother58
Story of the Brahmacharin's son58
Story of the astrologer who killed his son59
Story of the violent man who justified his character59-60
Story of the foolish king who made his daughter grow60
Story of the man who recovered half a pana from his servant60
Story of the fool who took notes of a certain spot in the sea60-61
Story of the king who replaced the flesh 61
Story of the woman who wanted another son61
Story of the servant who tasted the fruit62
Story of the two brothers Yajnasoma and Kirtisoma62-63
Story of the fool who wanted a barber63
Story of the man who asked for nothing at all63
CHAPTER LXII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son64-79
Story of the war between the crows and the owls64-75
Story of the ass in the panther's skin65
Story the crow dissuaded the birds from choosing the owl king65-68
Story of the elephant and the hares66-67
Story of the bird, the hare, and the cat67-68
Story of the Brahman, the goat, and the rogues68-69
Story of the old merchant and his young wife69-70
Story of the Brahman, the thief, and the Rakshasa70
Story of the carpenter and his wife71-72
Story of the mouse that was turned into a maiden72-73
Story of the snake and the frogs74
Story of the foolish servant75
Story of the two brothers who divided all that they had75
Story of the mendicant who became emaciated from discontent75-76
Story of the fool who saw gold in the water76
Story of the servants who kept rain off the trunks76-77
Story of the fool and the cakes77
Story of the servant who looked after the door77
Story of the simpletons who ate the buffalo77-78
Story of the fool who behaved like a Brahmany drake78
Story of the physician who tried to cure a hunchback78-79
CHAPTER LXI
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son 44-63
Story of the foolish merchant who made aloes-wood into charcoal44
Story of the man who sowed roasted seed44
Story of the man who mixed fire and water44
Story of the man who tried to improve his wife's nose45
Story of the foolish herdsman45
Story of the fool and the ornaments45
Story of the fool and the cotton45
Story of the foolish villagers who cut down the palm-trees46
Story of the treasure-finder who was blinded46
Story of the fool and the salt46-47
Story of the fool and his milch-cow47
Story of the foolish bald man and the fool who pelted him47
Story of the crow, and the king of the pigeons, the tortoise and the deer 48-52
Story of the mouse and the hermit49-51
Story of the Brahman's wife and the sesame-seeds50-51
Story of the greedy jackal50
Story of the wife who falsely accused her husband of murdering a Bhilla53-54
Story of the bald man and the hair-rostorer55
Story of a foolish servant55
Story of the faithless wife who was present at her own S'raddha55-56
Story of the ambitions Chandala maiden56
Story of the miserly king57
Story of Dhavalamukha, his trading friend, and his fighting friend57-58
Story of the thirsty fool that did not drink58
Story of the fool who killed his son58
Story of the fool and his brother58
Story of the Brahmacharin's son59
Story of the astrologer who killed his son59
Story of the violent man who justified his character59-60
Story of the foolish king who made his daughter grow 60
Story of the man who recovered half a pana from his servant60
Story of the fool who took notes of a certain spot in the sea60-61
Story of the king who replaced the flesh61
Story of the woman who wanted another son61
Story of the servant who tasted the fruit62
Story of the two brothers Yajnasoma and Kirtisoma62-63
Story of the fool who wanted a barber63
Story of the man who asked for nothing at all63
CHAPTER LXII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son64-79
Story of the war between the crows and the owls64-75
Story of the ass in the panther's skin65
Story the crow dissuaded the birds from choosing the owl king65-68
Story of the elephant and the hares66-67
Story of the bird, the hare, and the cat67-68
Story of the Brahman, the goat, and the rogues68-69
Story of the old merchant and his young wife69-70
Story of the Brahman, the thief, and the Rakshasa70
Story of the carpenter and his wife71-72
Story of the mouse that was turned into a maiden72-73
Story of the snake and the frogs74
Story of the foolish servant75
Story of the two brothers who divided all that they had75
Story of the mendicant who became emaciated from discontent75-76
Story of the fool who saw gold in the water76
Story of the servants who kept rain off the trunks76-77
Story of the fool and the cakes77
Story of the servant who looked after the door77
Story of the simpletons who ate the buffalo77-78
Story of the fool who behaved like a Brahmany drake78
Story of the physician who tried to cure a hunchback78-79
CHAPTER LXIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son79-90
Story of Yasodhara and Lakshmidhara and the two wives o the water-genius79-83
Story of the water-genius in his previous birth82
Story of the Story of the Brahman who became a Yaksha83
Story of the monkey and the porpose84-87
Story of the sick lion, the jackal, and the ass85-87
Story of the fool who gave a verbal reward to the musician87
Story of the teacher and his two jealous pupils88
Story of the snake with two heads88-89
Story of the fool who was nearly choked with rice89
Story of the boys that milked the donkey89-90
Story of the foolish boy that went to the village for nothing90
CHAPTER LXIV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son90-100
Story of the Brahman and the mungoose90-91
Story of the fool that was his own doctor91
Story of the fool who mistook hermits for monkeys91-92
Story of the fool who found a purse92
Story of the fool who looked or the moon92
Story of the woman who escaped from the monkey and the cowherd92-93
Story of the two thieves Ghata and Karpara93-96
Story of Devadatta's wife96
Story of the wife of the Brahman Rudrasoma96-97
Story of the wife of S'asin97-98
Story of the snake-god and his wife98-99
CHAPTER LXV
Continuation of the story of Udayans and his son101-115
Story of the ungrateful wife101-103
Story of the grateful animals and the ungrateful woman103-108
The lion's story104-105
The golden-crested bird's story 105-106
The snake's story 106
The woman's story 106
Story of the man who submitted to be burnt alive sooner than share his food with a guest 109-110
Story of the foolish teacher, the foolish pupils, and the cat 110-111
Story of the fools and the bull of S'iva111-112
Story of the fool who asked his way to the village112
Story of Hiranyaksha and Mrigankalekha113-115
CHAPTER LXVI
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son 115-124
Story of the mendicant who travelled from Kasmira to Pataliputra115-118
Story of the wife of king Sinhaksha, and the wives of his principal courtiers116-118
Story of the woman who had eleven husbands119
Story of the man who, thanks to Durga had always one ox119-120
Story of the man who managed to acquire wealth by speaking to the king120-121
Story of the Ratnarekha and Lakshmisena121-124
Story of Naravahanadatta and S'aktiyasas124
BOOK XI
CHAPTER LXVII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son 125-131
Story of the race between the elephant and the horses125-126
Story of the merchant and his wife Vela127-131
Marriage of Naravahanadatta and Jayendrasena131
BOOK XII,
CHAPTER LXVIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son 133-137
Marriage of Naravahanadatta and Lalitalochana 134
Story of the jackal that was turned into an elephant134
Story of Vamadatta and his wicked wife 134-137
CHAPTER LXIX
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son 137-138
Story of Mrigankadatta and Sasankavati138-146
Story of king Bhadrabahu and his clever minister139-141
Story of Pushkaraksha and Vinayavati141-146
Story of the birth of Vinayavati141-142
The adventures of Pushkaraksha and Vinayavati in a former life143-145
Story of Lavanyamanjari 145
CHAPTER LXX
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and Sasankavati 146-154
Story of Srutadhi 148
CHAPTER LXXI
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and S'asankavati 154-169
Story of Kamalakara and Hansavali 157-167
CHAPTER LXXII
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and S'asankavati 170-191
Story of king Vinitamati who became a holy man 171-191
Story of the holy boar176-178
Story of Devabhuti180-181
Story of the generous Induprabha181-182
Story of the parrot who was taught virtue by the king of the parrots182-183
Story of the patient hermit S'ubhanaya183-184
Story of the persevering young Brahman184
Story of Malayamalin184-186
Story of the robber who wen over Yama's secretary186-189
CHAPTER LXXIII
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and S'asankavati 191-214
Story of S'ridarsana 192-214
Story of Saudamini193-194
Story of Bhunandana 196-201
CHAPTER LXXIV
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and S'asankavati 214-231
Story of Bhimabhata215-230
Story of Akshakshapanaka222-223
CHAPTER LXXV
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and S'asankavati 231-232
Story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 232-241
Story of the who was helped to a wife by the son of his father's minister234-241
CHAPTER LXXVI
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 242-244
Story of the three young Brahmans who restored a dead lady to life242-244
CHAPTER LXVII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire45-250
Story of the king and the two wise birds245-250
The maina's story246-247
The parrot's story247-250
CHAPTER LXXVIII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 251-257
Story of Somaprabha and her three sisters258-260
CHAPTER LXXX
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 261-264
Story of the lady who caused her brother and husband to change heads261-264
CHAPTER LXXXI
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire265-271
Story of the of the king who married his dependent to the Nereid 265-271
CHAPTER LXXXII
Continuation of the Story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire271-274
Story of the three fastidious men271-273
CHAPTER LXXXIII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 275-277
Story of Anangarati and her four suitors275-277
CHAPTER LXXXIV
Continuation Of The Story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 277-281
Story of Madanasena and her rash promise 278-280
CHAPTER LXXXV
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire281-283
Story of king Dharmadhvaja and his three very sensitive wives 281-283
CHAPTER LXXXVI
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 284-293
Story of king Yasahketu, his Vidyadhari wife and his faithful minister 284-292
CHAPTER LXXXVII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 293-296
CHAPTER LXXXVIII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 297-300
Story of the merchant's daughter who fell in love with a thief297-300
CHAPTER LXXXIX
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire301-397
Story of the magic globule301-306
CHAPTER XC
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire307-318
Story of Jimutavahana307-317
CHAPTER XCI
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire318-322
Story of Unmadini318-321
CHAPTER XCII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire322-327
Story of the Brahman's son who failed to acquire the magic power323-327
CHAPTER XCIII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire322-327
Story of the Brahman's son who failed to acquire the magic power323-327
CHAPTER XCIII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire328-334
CHAPTER XCIV
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire334-342
Story of the Brahman boy who offered himself up to save the life of the king335-341
CHAPTER XCV
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire342-347
Story of Anangamanjari, her husband Manivarman, and the Brahman Kamalakara342-347
CHAPTER XCVI
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire348-350
Story of the our Brahman brothers who resuscitated the tiger348-350
CHAPTER XCVII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire351-354
Story of the Hermit who first wept and then danced351-353
CHAPTER XCVIII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire354-358
Story of the father that married the daughter and the son that married the mother354-357
CHAPTER XCIX
Conclusion of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire358-360
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and Sasankavati360-362
CHAPTER C.
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and Sasankavati362-365
CHAPTER CI
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and Sasankavati366-386
Story of Sundarasena and Mandaravati368-385
CHAPTER CII
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and Sasankavati87-396
CHAPTER CIII
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and Sasankavati396-409
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son409
BOOK XIII
CHAPTER CIV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son411-423
Story of the two Brahman friends412-423
BOOK XIV
CHAPTER CV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son425-430
Story of Savitri and Angiras426-427
CHAPTER CVI
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son441-418
Story of Rama442
CHAPTER CVIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son448-460
Story of Nagasvamin and the witches449-452
Story of Marubhuti and the mermaids and the gold-producing grains452-454
BOOK XV
CHAPTER CIX
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son461-460
History of the cave of Trisirsha464-465
CHAPTER CX
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son469-478
Naravahanadatta crowned emperor of the Vidyadharas473-474
BOOK XVI
CHAPTER CXI
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son479-483
Story of the devoted couple Surasena and Sushena480-481
Doath of Chandamahasena and Angaravati482
Death of Udayana king of Vatsa483
Continuation of the story of Naravahanadatta son of Udayana484-485
CHAPTER CXII
Continuation of the story of Naravahanadatta son of Udayana485-497
Story of king Chandamahasena and the Asura's daughter486-488
Story of Prince Avantivardhana and the daughter of the Matanga488-496
Story of the young Chandala who married the daughter of king Prasenajit490-491
Story of the young fisherman who married a princess491-493
Story of the Merchant's daughter who fell in love with a thief493-495
CHAPTER CXIII
Continuation of the story of Naravahanadatta son of Udayana497-503
BOOK XVII
CHAPTER CXIV
Continuation of the story of Naravahanadatta son of Udayana505-513
Story of king Brahmadatta and the swans506-513
How Parvati condemned her five attendants to be reborn on earth508-510
Story of the metamorphoses of Pingesvara and Guhesvara519-513
CHAPTER CXV
Continuation of the story of Brahmadatta and the swans513-514
Story of Muktaphalaketu and Padmavati514-522
CHAPTER CXVI
Continuation of the story of Muktaphalaketu and Padmavati522-528
CHAPTER CXVII
Continuation of the story of Muktaphalaketu and Padmavati528-538
CHAPTER CXVIII
Continuation of the story of Muktaphalaketu Padmavati538-519
CHAPTER CXIX
Conclusion of the story of Muktaphalaketu and Padmavati519-561
Conclusion of the story of Brahmadatta and the swans561
Continuation of the story of Naravahanadatta son of Udayana561
BOOK XVIII
CHAPTER CXX
Continuation of the story of Naravahanadatta son of Udayana563
Story of Vikramaditya king of Ujjayini563-579
CHAPTER CXXI
Continuation of the story of Vikramaditya king of Ujjayini571-586
Story of Madanamanjari571-583
Story of the gambler Dagineya572-574
Story of Thinthakarala the bold gambler574-582
Story of the gambler who cheated Yama581
Story of Ghanta and Nighanta and the two maidens583
Story of the golden deer584
CHAPTER CXXIII
Continuation of the story of Vikramaditya king of Ujjayini593
Story of Kalingasena's marriage593-611
How Devasena obtained the magic ointment594
Story of the grateful monkey596-597
Story of the two princesses598-599
Story of Dhanadatta600-601
Story of Kesata and Kandarpa601-610
Story of Kusumayudha and Kamalalochana606-607
CHAPTER CXXIV
Conclusion of the story of Kalingasena's marriage611-614
Story of Chandrasvamin611-612
Conclusion of the story of Vikramaditya king of Ujjayini614-624
Story of Devasvamin616-617
Story of Agnisarman617-618
Story of Muladeva618-624
Conclusion of the story of Naravahanadatta son of Udayana624
Conclusion of the Katha Sarit Sagara625

From the Jacket :

Somadeva's Katha Sarit Sagara or Ocean of the Streams of Story is a work of early medieval literature. The work itself is a symbol of continuity of literary process, as it stems from the rather mysterious Brihat Katha of Gunadhya.

The Katha Sarit Sagara deals not so much with concrete historical events but with problems and processes of life, not so much with concrete historical personalities but mostly with concrete types of people, specific to the time in which Somadeva lived. But as he in his remarkable work reflected life of his time, we are in all earnest right to look for a real historical landscape in his work. We are very much helped by author himself who inspite of certain literary traditions, already canonized in his time, selected the way of Auchitya, the way of realistic imagery, so eloquently propounded by his predecessors.

Somadeva collected and presented to us in this work more than 350 stories – fairy tales, novels, short stories, fables, anecdotes etc., which were current among the people. He gave them brilliant form with full sense of Auchitya and also the appropriate dress. And from the literary point of view the Katha Sarit Sagara is real embodiment of the best achievements of the art and literature in early medieval India.

About the Author :

Charles Henry Tawney, Born 1837; Son of Rev. Richard Tawney: educated at Rugby and Trinity College, Cambridge: Scholar: Seniro Classic, 1860: Fellow of Trinity College, 1860: for many years Professor and President of the Presidency College, Calcutta, and Registrar of the Calcutta University: officiated thrice as Director of Public Instruction, Bengal: author of several translations from the Sanskrit: C.I.E.: Librarian of the Indian Office: retired 1903.


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The Katha Sarit Sagara: The Ocean of the Streams of Story – 2 Volumes (Translated from the Original Sanskrit)

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1992
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The Katha Sarit Sagara: The Ocean of the Streams of Story – 2 Volumes (Translated from the Original Sanskrit)

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A Few Thoughts on the Katha Sarit Sagara

It is not only pleasure but great honour to write on this remarkable work of the genius of India's people. Thought known or very long time and being a subject for researches of quite a few scholars the Kathasaritsagara still stays as one of the most difficult riddles in the history of early mediaeval literature of the people of India. Somadeva's work itself is a symbol of continuity of literary process in India, as it stems from the rather mysterious Brihat Katha of Gunadhya. Materials concerning Brihat Katha and its later versions are pretty well known. One may refer to find them in famous works of A. B. Keith, M. Winternitz, F. Lacote, S. K. De and many others.

The Kathasaritsagara was translated a number of times in European languages in portions but so far there was only one translation whole work and this is famous translation by C. H. Tawney originally published by Asiatic Society of Bengal and later edited with extensive notes and comments by N. M. Penzer. Both editions are or a long time out of print and became a real bibliographical rarity. Quite a long time necessity of new edition was felt and Messrs Munshiram Manoharlal have to be congratulated and thanked by every indologist and connoisseure of literature for bringing a new edition of C. H. Tawney's translation.

The latest decades have shown very rapid progress in research work almost in every field of Indology. But it has to be stated that certain traditions still are prevailing and some works of ancient and mediaeval authors still do not get attention they deserve, among them one may name the Kathasaritsagara. it goes without saying that works of H. Brokhaus, F. Lacote, N. M. Penzer and some other authors laid necessary foundations for further research, but since then the work which was done in different fields of Indology allows us to reassess importance of Somadeva's work and its meaning not only for indological research but also for contemporaneity. I would like to mark such an interesting undertaking as new publication of The Kathasaritsagara which was started by the Bihar Rashtra Bhasha Parishad, two volumes of which already have come out.

Indisputable is a magnificent contribution of people of India to the world culture and literature and research in this sphere, as well as acquaintance with achievements of Indian culture and literature enrich intellectual life of other peoples as well acquaintance with cultural heritage and contemporary culture and literature of other peoples enriches-intellectual world of an Indian. There is none most reliable media of such mutually beneficial cultural exchange and this media is translation.

There are different approaches to the problem of translation. One may prefer literal translation in which quality of art is hopelessly lost but certain appearance of "Scientific translation" comes in to the picture; another may prefer such method of translation which transfer the very subject and personae dramatis into alien surrounding or the "art's sake". There can be another method of translation, according which plot, style and imagery created by an author in atmosphere of his epoch, language and social environment are being transferred by a translator, belonging to another historical epoch, in atmosphere of his language, making ideas problems, values of life, imagery, style of a certain alien author, near and understandable to compatriots of a translator brings the best results. Though already more than eighty years passed since C. H. Tawney's translation was published it is still alive and quite readable because the translator followed above mentioned method.

Many attempts were done so far to find out historical authencity of some heroes and events in The Kathasaritsagara. But as well deal here with a work of art we are bound to have in view that life was reflected in this work not as in the mirror of history but through poet's imagery. The Kathasaritsagara deals not so much with concrete historical events but with problems and processes of life, not so much with concrete historical personalities but mostly with concrete types of people, specific to the time and country in which Somadeva lived. Kalhana was a historian, Somadeva was an artist. But as he in his remarkable work reflected life of his time we are in all earnest right to look for a real historical landscape in his work. We are very much helped by author himself who inspite of certain literary traditions, already canonized in his time selected the way of "Auchitya", the way of realistic imagery, so eloquently propounded by his predecessor famous poet and theoretician of literature Kshemendra "Auchitya Vichara Charcha" Concept of "Auchitya' the way of realistic imagery, so eloquently propounded by his predecessor famous poet and theoretician of literature Kshemendra "Auchitya Vichara Charcha". Concept of "Auchitya" was really bold attempt to put development of literature on the broad highway of realism. Of course, the narrative itself is centered around stories about Udayana and Naravahanadatta and has definitely airy tale-like mythological character, but within this frame we find wonderful pictures of every day life of the then India. Objection can be made that Somadeva himself said that he was true to his source-original text of Gunadhya's Brihat Brihat Katha. Here no contradiction exists-it is quite possible that he based himself on original text of Brihat Katha and while doing so Somadeva reflected in number of stories life of contemporary society. One of the most important contributions of Somadeva to the literature is that he collected and presented to us in his work more than 350 stories-fairy tales, novels, shortstories, fables anecdotes etc which were current among the people. He gave them brilliant form, with full sense of "Auchitya" and also the appropiate literary dress. In stories of Udayana and Naravahanadatta his style goes up to the heights of best examples of Mahakavya, in "Vetala Panchvinshati and "Panchatantra" his styles is very simple and lucid and in case of anecdotes it becomes some time even primitive. His mastery in style, imagery and plot was prepared by the whole preceding development of literatures of peoples of India, and in certain sense The Kathasaritsagara may be viewed as sum total of preceding development. From the literary point of view The Katha-sarit-sagara is real embodiment of the best achievements of the art of literature in early mediaeval India.

What was said above does not diminish works of Somadeva's predecessors Buddhaswamin and Kshemendra. They had put before themselves quite different aims. Buddhaswamin actually wrote a novel on Naravahanadatta and Kshemendra whole Brhatkathamanjari as it seems to me is underestimated as it was usually treated from point of view of fullness of his narrative. If we shall see Brhatkathamanjari in context of whole creative heritage of Kshemendra then we may come to correct assessment of his work.

Fifteen years will pass and we shall mark ninth centenary of the Kathasaritsagara. I allow myself to express hope that within this period new and new works on The Katha-sarit-sagra will appear, translations of this remarkable work of genius will come out in many other languages. Let the present publication of C. H. Tawney's translation become starting point for this work and let joint efforts of Indian Scholars and their colleagues in other countries contribute to disclosure of secrets of The Kathasaritsagara and to popularize it among the people.

CONTENTS
BOOK I.
CHAPTER I
Introduction1-5
Curse of Pushpadanta and Malyavan,4-5
CHAPTER II
Story of Pushpadanta when living on the earth as Vararuchi 5-10
How Kanabhuti became a Pisacha,6-7
Story of Vararuchi's teacher Varsha, and his fellow-pupils Vyadi and Indradatta,7-10
CHAPTER III
Continuation of the story of Vararuchi11-16
Story of the founding of the city of Pataliputra11-16
Story of king Brahmadatta,12-13
CHAPTER IV
Continuation of the story of Vararuchi,16-23
Story of Upakosa and her four lovers,17-20
CHAPTER V
Conclusion of the story of Vararuchi,23-31
Story of Sivasaraman,27-28
CHAPTER VI
Story of malyavan when living on the earth as Gunadhya32-40
Story of the Mouse-merchant,33-34
Story of the chanter of the Sama Veda34-35
Story of Satavahana,36-37
CHAPTER VII
Continuation of the story of Gunadhya,41-37
How Pashpadanta got this name,43-46
Story of king Sivi,45-46
CHAPTER VIII
Continuation of the story of Gunadhya,47-49
Siva's tales, originally composed by Gunadhtya in the Paisacha language, are made known in Sanskrit under the title of Vrihat Katha, 49
BOOK II.
CHAPTER IX
Story of the ancestors and parents of Udayana king of Vatsa,52-56
CHAPTER X
Continuation of the story of Udayana's parents,56-57
Story of Sridatta and Mrigankavati,56-66
Udayana succeeds to the kingdom of Vatsa,67
CHAPTER XI
Continuation of the story of Udayana,67-71
Story of king Chandamahasena,69-71
CHAPTER XII
Continuation of the story of Udayana,72-82
Story of Rupinika,76-82
CHAPTER XIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana,82-93
Story of Devasmita,85-92
Story of the cunning Siddhikari,87-88
Story of Saktimati,91-92
CHAPTER XIV
Continuation of the story of Udayana,94-98
Story of the clever Deformed child,96
Story of Ruru.97-98
BOOK III
CHAPTER XV
Continuation of the story of Udayana,101-109
Story of the clever physician,101-102
Story of the hypoctitical ascetic,102-104
Story of Unmadini,104-105
Story of the loving couple who died of separation,105-106
Story of Punyasena,106
Story of Sunda and Upasunda,108
Continuation of the story of Udayana109-115
Story of Kunti,110-111
CHAPTER XVII
Continuation of the story of Udayana,115-124
Story of Urvasi,115-117
Story of Vihitasena,117
Story of Somaprabha,118-122
Story of Ahalya,122-123
CHAPTER XVIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana,124-145
Story of Vidushaka,128-144
CHAPTER XIX
Continuation of the story of Udayana,145-152
Story of Devadasa,146-147
CHAPTER XX
Continuation of the story of Udayana152-164
Story of Phalabhuti,152-163
Story of Kuvalayavali and the witch Kalaratri,155-158
Story of the birth of Kartikeya,155-157
Story of Sundaraka and Kalaratri,158-161
BOOK IV
CHAPTER XXI
Continuation of the story of Udayana,165-173
Story of Pandu,166
Story of Devadatta168-170
Story of Pingalika,170-171
CHAPTER XXII
Continuation of the story of Udayana,173-186
Story of Jimutavahana174-186
Story of Jimutavahana's adventures in a former life,176-181
Story of Kadru and Vinata,182-183
CHAPTER XXIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana186-191
Story of Sinhaparakrama,188
Birth of Udayana's son Naravahanadatta,189
BOOK V
CHAPTER XXIV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,193-204
Story of Saktivega king of the Vidyadharas,194-204
Story of Siva and Madhava,197-202
Story of Harasvamin,203-204
CHAPTER XXV
Continuation of the story of Saktivega,205-219
Story of Asokadatta and Vijayadatta,208-219
CHAPTER XXVI
Conclusion of the story of Saktivega 220-233
Story of Devadatta,229-231
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,233
BOOK VI
CHAPTER XXVII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,235-246
Story of Kalingadatta, king of Takshasila,235-246
Story of the merchant's son in Takshasila236-238
Story of the Apsaras Surabhidatta,238-239
Story of king Dharmadatta and his wife Nagasri239-240
Story of the seven Brahmans who devoured a cow in time of famine,241
Story of the two ascetics, the one a Brahman, the other a Chandala,241-242
Story of king Vikramasinha and the two Brahmans,242-246
CHAPTER XXVIII
Continuation of the story of kalingadatta,246-257
Birth of his daughter Kalingasena,246
Story of the seven princesses,247-249
Story of the prince who tore out his own eye,247-248
Story of the ascetic who conquered anger,248-249
Story of Sulochana and Sushena,249-252
Story of the prince and the merchants son who saved his life,253-255
Story of the Brahman and the Pisacha,255-256
CHAPTER XXIX
Continuation of the story of Kalingadatta,257-267
CHAPTER XXX
Continuation of the story of Kalingadatta,267-274
Story of Tejasvati,270-271
Story of the Brahman Harisarman,272-274
Conclusion of the story of Kalingadatta,276-278
Kalingasena daughter of Kalingadatta escapes to Vatsa,278
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son278-280
CHAPTER XXXII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,281-291
Story of the Brahman's son Vishnudatta and his foolish companions283-285
Story of the king and the barber's wife,288-289
CHAPTER XXXIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,291-302
Story of Srutasena,292-295
Story of the three Brahman brothers,293
Story of Devasena and Unmadini,294
Story of the ichneumon, the owl, the cat the mouse,296-298
Story of king Prasenajit the owl, the Brahman who lost his treasure,298-299
CHAPTER XXXIV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,302-317
Story of king Indradatta,303
Story of the Yaksha Virupaksha,306-307
Story of Satrughna and his wicked wife,313-314
Story of king Harisinha,314
BOOK VII
CHAPTER XXXV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,319-327
Story of Ratnaprabha320-226
Story of Sattvasila and the two treasures,321-322
Story of the brave king Vikramatunga,322-323
CHAPTER XXXVI
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,328-334
Story of king Ratnadhipati and the white elephant Svetarasmi,328-334
Story of Yavanasena,331-332
CHAPTER XXXVII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,334-346
Story of Nischayadatta,334-346
Story of Somasvamin ,339-341
Story of Bhavasarman,342-343
CHAPTER XXXVIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,346-354
Story of king Vikramaditya and the hetaera,357-354
Story of king Vikramaditya and the treacherous mendicant,349-350
CHAPTER XXXIX
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,355-357
Story of Sringabhuja and the daughter of the Rakshasa,355-367
CHAPTER XL
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,369-375
Story of Tapodatta,370
Story of Virupasarman,371
Story of king Vilasasila and the physician Tarunachandra,372-375
CHAPTER XLI
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,376-379
Story of king Chirayus and his minister Nagarjuna,376-378
CHAPTER XLI
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,376-379
Story of king Chirayus and his minister Nagarjuna,376-378
CHAPTER XLII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,379-390
Story of king Prityagasena, his wicked wife, and his two sons,381-381
CHAPTER XLIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,390-403
Story of the two brothers Pranadhara and Rajyadhara,391-393
Story of Arthalobha and his beautiful wife,393-396
Story of the princess Karpurika in her birth as a swan,397-398
BOOK VIII
CHAPTER XLIV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,405-406
Story of Suryaprabha,406-414
CHAPTER XLV
Continuation of the story of Suryaprabha414-434
Story of the generous Danava Namuchi,444-446
CHAPTER XLVII
Continuation of the story of Suryaprabha,446-452
CHAPTER XLVIII
Continuation of the story of Suryaprabha,452-459
Adventure of the witch Sarabhanana,458
CHAPTER XLIX
Continuation of the story of Suryaprabha,459-471
Story of king Mahasena and his virtuous minister Gunasarman,459-471
CHAPTER L
Conclusion of the story of Suryaprabha,472-481
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,481
BOOK LX.
CHAPTER LI
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son483-494
Story of Alankaravati.484-485
Story of Rama and Sita,486-488
Story of the handsome king Prithvirupa,489-492
CHAPTER LII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son494-515
Story of Asokamala,496-498
Story of Sthulabhuja,497-498
Story of Anangarati and her four suitors,498-514
Story of Anangarati in a former birth,502-503
CHAPTER LIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,515-524
Story of king Lakshadatta and his dependent Labdhadatta,515-518
Story of the Brahman Viravara,519-524
Story of Suprabha,520-521
CHAPTER LIV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,524-537
Story of the merchant Samudrasura,529-531
Story of king Chamarabala,532-536
Story of Yasovarman and the two fortunes,532-535
CHAPTER LV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son,537-549
Story of Chiradatri537-538
Story of king Kanakavarsha and Madanasundari,538-549
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son549-569
Story of the Brahman Chandrasvamin, his son Mahipala, and his daughter Chandravati,549-569
Story of Chakra,554-556
Story of the hermit and the faithful wife,556-557
Story of Dharmavyadha the righteous seller of flesh,557
Story of the treacherous Pasupata ascetic,558-559
Story of king Tribhuvana,558-559
Story of Nala and Damayanti,559-568
CONTENTS OF VOL. II.
BOOK X.
CHAPTER LVII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son1-10
Story of the porter who found a bracelet1-2
Story of the inexhaustible pitcher2-4
Story of the merchant's son, the hetaera and the wonderful ape Ala4-10
CHAPTER LVIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son10-17
Story of king Vikramasinha, the hetaera and the young Brahman11-13
Story of the faithless wife who burnt herself with her husband's body13-14
Story of the faithless wife who had her husband murdered14
Story of Vajrasara whose wife cut off his nose and ears14-16
Story of king Sinhabala and his faithless wife16-17
CHAPTER LIX
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son17-26
Story of king Sumanas, the Nishada maiden, and the learned parrot18-26
The parrot's account of his own life as a parrot19-21
The hermit's story of Somaprabha, Manorathaprabha, and Makarandika21-25
Episode of Manorathaprabha and Rasmimat22-23
CHAPTER LX
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son27-43
Story of Suravarman who spared his guilty wife27
Story of the ox abandoned in the forest, and the lion, and the two jackals27-43
Story of the monkey that pulled out the wedge28
Story of the jackal and the drum30
Story of the crane and the Makara31-32
Story of the lion and the hare32-33
Story of the louse and the flea34
Story of the lion, the panther, the crow and the jackal35-36
Story of the pair of titthibhas36-38
Story of the tortoise and the two swans37
Story of the three fish37-38
Story of the monkeys, the firefly and the bird39
Story of Dharmabuddhi and Dushtabuddhi40-41
Story of the crane, the snake, and the mungoose41
Story of the mice that ate an iron balance41-42
CHAPTER LXI
Continuation of the story Udayana and his son44-63
Story of the foolish merchant who made aloes-wood into charcoal44
Story of the Story of the man who sowed roasted seed44
Story of the man who mixed fire and water44
Story of the man who tried to improve his wife's nose45
Story of the foolish herdsman45
Story of the fool and the ornaments45
Story of the fool and the cotton45
Story of the foolish villagers who cut down the palm-trees46
Story of the treasure-finder who was blinded46
Story of the fool and the salt46-47
Story of the fool and his milch-cow47
Story of the foolish bald man and the fool who pelted him47
Story of the crow, and the king of the pigeons, the tortoise and the deer48-52
Story of the mouse and the hermit49-51
Story of the Brahman's wife and the sesame-seeds50-51
Story of the greedy jackal50
Story of the wife who falsely accused her husband of murdering a Bhilla53-54
Story of the snake who told his secret to a woman54-55
Story of the bald man and the hair-restorer55
Story of the foolish servant55
Story of the faithless wife who was present at her own S'raddha55-56
Story of the ambitious Chandala maiden56
Story of the miserly king57
Story of Dhavalamukha, his trading fried, and his fighting friend57-58
Story of the thirsty fool that did not drink58
Story of the fool who killed his son58
Story of the fool and his brother58
Story of the Brahmacharin's son58
Story of the astrologer who killed his son59
Story of the violent man who justified his character59-60
Story of the foolish king who made his daughter grow60
Story of the man who recovered half a pana from his servant60
Story of the fool who took notes of a certain spot in the sea60-61
Story of the king who replaced the flesh 61
Story of the woman who wanted another son61
Story of the servant who tasted the fruit62
Story of the two brothers Yajnasoma and Kirtisoma62-63
Story of the fool who wanted a barber63
Story of the man who asked for nothing at all63
CHAPTER LXII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son64-79
Story of the war between the crows and the owls64-75
Story of the ass in the panther's skin65
Story the crow dissuaded the birds from choosing the owl king65-68
Story of the elephant and the hares66-67
Story of the bird, the hare, and the cat67-68
Story of the Brahman, the goat, and the rogues68-69
Story of the old merchant and his young wife69-70
Story of the Brahman, the thief, and the Rakshasa70
Story of the carpenter and his wife71-72
Story of the mouse that was turned into a maiden72-73
Story of the snake and the frogs74
Story of the foolish servant75
Story of the two brothers who divided all that they had75
Story of the mendicant who became emaciated from discontent75-76
Story of the fool who saw gold in the water76
Story of the servants who kept rain off the trunks76-77
Story of the fool and the cakes77
Story of the servant who looked after the door77
Story of the simpletons who ate the buffalo77-78
Story of the fool who behaved like a Brahmany drake78
Story of the physician who tried to cure a hunchback78-79
CHAPTER LXI
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son 44-63
Story of the foolish merchant who made aloes-wood into charcoal44
Story of the man who sowed roasted seed44
Story of the man who mixed fire and water44
Story of the man who tried to improve his wife's nose45
Story of the foolish herdsman45
Story of the fool and the ornaments45
Story of the fool and the cotton45
Story of the foolish villagers who cut down the palm-trees46
Story of the treasure-finder who was blinded46
Story of the fool and the salt46-47
Story of the fool and his milch-cow47
Story of the foolish bald man and the fool who pelted him47
Story of the crow, and the king of the pigeons, the tortoise and the deer 48-52
Story of the mouse and the hermit49-51
Story of the Brahman's wife and the sesame-seeds50-51
Story of the greedy jackal50
Story of the wife who falsely accused her husband of murdering a Bhilla53-54
Story of the bald man and the hair-rostorer55
Story of a foolish servant55
Story of the faithless wife who was present at her own S'raddha55-56
Story of the ambitions Chandala maiden56
Story of the miserly king57
Story of Dhavalamukha, his trading friend, and his fighting friend57-58
Story of the thirsty fool that did not drink58
Story of the fool who killed his son58
Story of the fool and his brother58
Story of the Brahmacharin's son59
Story of the astrologer who killed his son59
Story of the violent man who justified his character59-60
Story of the foolish king who made his daughter grow 60
Story of the man who recovered half a pana from his servant60
Story of the fool who took notes of a certain spot in the sea60-61
Story of the king who replaced the flesh61
Story of the woman who wanted another son61
Story of the servant who tasted the fruit62
Story of the two brothers Yajnasoma and Kirtisoma62-63
Story of the fool who wanted a barber63
Story of the man who asked for nothing at all63
CHAPTER LXII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son64-79
Story of the war between the crows and the owls64-75
Story of the ass in the panther's skin65
Story the crow dissuaded the birds from choosing the owl king65-68
Story of the elephant and the hares66-67
Story of the bird, the hare, and the cat67-68
Story of the Brahman, the goat, and the rogues68-69
Story of the old merchant and his young wife69-70
Story of the Brahman, the thief, and the Rakshasa70
Story of the carpenter and his wife71-72
Story of the mouse that was turned into a maiden72-73
Story of the snake and the frogs74
Story of the foolish servant75
Story of the two brothers who divided all that they had75
Story of the mendicant who became emaciated from discontent75-76
Story of the fool who saw gold in the water76
Story of the servants who kept rain off the trunks76-77
Story of the fool and the cakes77
Story of the servant who looked after the door77
Story of the simpletons who ate the buffalo77-78
Story of the fool who behaved like a Brahmany drake78
Story of the physician who tried to cure a hunchback78-79
CHAPTER LXIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son79-90
Story of Yasodhara and Lakshmidhara and the two wives o the water-genius79-83
Story of the water-genius in his previous birth82
Story of the Story of the Brahman who became a Yaksha83
Story of the monkey and the porpose84-87
Story of the sick lion, the jackal, and the ass85-87
Story of the fool who gave a verbal reward to the musician87
Story of the teacher and his two jealous pupils88
Story of the snake with two heads88-89
Story of the fool who was nearly choked with rice89
Story of the boys that milked the donkey89-90
Story of the foolish boy that went to the village for nothing90
CHAPTER LXIV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son90-100
Story of the Brahman and the mungoose90-91
Story of the fool that was his own doctor91
Story of the fool who mistook hermits for monkeys91-92
Story of the fool who found a purse92
Story of the fool who looked or the moon92
Story of the woman who escaped from the monkey and the cowherd92-93
Story of the two thieves Ghata and Karpara93-96
Story of Devadatta's wife96
Story of the wife of the Brahman Rudrasoma96-97
Story of the wife of S'asin97-98
Story of the snake-god and his wife98-99
CHAPTER LXV
Continuation of the story of Udayans and his son101-115
Story of the ungrateful wife101-103
Story of the grateful animals and the ungrateful woman103-108
The lion's story104-105
The golden-crested bird's story 105-106
The snake's story 106
The woman's story 106
Story of the man who submitted to be burnt alive sooner than share his food with a guest 109-110
Story of the foolish teacher, the foolish pupils, and the cat 110-111
Story of the fools and the bull of S'iva111-112
Story of the fool who asked his way to the village112
Story of Hiranyaksha and Mrigankalekha113-115
CHAPTER LXVI
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son 115-124
Story of the mendicant who travelled from Kasmira to Pataliputra115-118
Story of the wife of king Sinhaksha, and the wives of his principal courtiers116-118
Story of the woman who had eleven husbands119
Story of the man who, thanks to Durga had always one ox119-120
Story of the man who managed to acquire wealth by speaking to the king120-121
Story of the Ratnarekha and Lakshmisena121-124
Story of Naravahanadatta and S'aktiyasas124
BOOK XI
CHAPTER LXVII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son 125-131
Story of the race between the elephant and the horses125-126
Story of the merchant and his wife Vela127-131
Marriage of Naravahanadatta and Jayendrasena131
BOOK XII,
CHAPTER LXVIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son 133-137
Marriage of Naravahanadatta and Lalitalochana 134
Story of the jackal that was turned into an elephant134
Story of Vamadatta and his wicked wife 134-137
CHAPTER LXIX
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son 137-138
Story of Mrigankadatta and Sasankavati138-146
Story of king Bhadrabahu and his clever minister139-141
Story of Pushkaraksha and Vinayavati141-146
Story of the birth of Vinayavati141-142
The adventures of Pushkaraksha and Vinayavati in a former life143-145
Story of Lavanyamanjari 145
CHAPTER LXX
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and Sasankavati 146-154
Story of Srutadhi 148
CHAPTER LXXI
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and S'asankavati 154-169
Story of Kamalakara and Hansavali 157-167
CHAPTER LXXII
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and S'asankavati 170-191
Story of king Vinitamati who became a holy man 171-191
Story of the holy boar176-178
Story of Devabhuti180-181
Story of the generous Induprabha181-182
Story of the parrot who was taught virtue by the king of the parrots182-183
Story of the patient hermit S'ubhanaya183-184
Story of the persevering young Brahman184
Story of Malayamalin184-186
Story of the robber who wen over Yama's secretary186-189
CHAPTER LXXIII
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and S'asankavati 191-214
Story of S'ridarsana 192-214
Story of Saudamini193-194
Story of Bhunandana 196-201
CHAPTER LXXIV
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and S'asankavati 214-231
Story of Bhimabhata215-230
Story of Akshakshapanaka222-223
CHAPTER LXXV
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and S'asankavati 231-232
Story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 232-241
Story of the who was helped to a wife by the son of his father's minister234-241
CHAPTER LXXVI
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 242-244
Story of the three young Brahmans who restored a dead lady to life242-244
CHAPTER LXVII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire45-250
Story of the king and the two wise birds245-250
The maina's story246-247
The parrot's story247-250
CHAPTER LXXVIII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 251-257
Story of Somaprabha and her three sisters258-260
CHAPTER LXXX
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 261-264
Story of the lady who caused her brother and husband to change heads261-264
CHAPTER LXXXI
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire265-271
Story of the of the king who married his dependent to the Nereid 265-271
CHAPTER LXXXII
Continuation of the Story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire271-274
Story of the three fastidious men271-273
CHAPTER LXXXIII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 275-277
Story of Anangarati and her four suitors275-277
CHAPTER LXXXIV
Continuation Of The Story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 277-281
Story of Madanasena and her rash promise 278-280
CHAPTER LXXXV
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire281-283
Story of king Dharmadhvaja and his three very sensitive wives 281-283
CHAPTER LXXXVI
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 284-293
Story of king Yasahketu, his Vidyadhari wife and his faithful minister 284-292
CHAPTER LXXXVII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 293-296
CHAPTER LXXXVIII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire 297-300
Story of the merchant's daughter who fell in love with a thief297-300
CHAPTER LXXXIX
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire301-397
Story of the magic globule301-306
CHAPTER XC
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire307-318
Story of Jimutavahana307-317
CHAPTER XCI
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire318-322
Story of Unmadini318-321
CHAPTER XCII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire322-327
Story of the Brahman's son who failed to acquire the magic power323-327
CHAPTER XCIII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire322-327
Story of the Brahman's son who failed to acquire the magic power323-327
CHAPTER XCIII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire328-334
CHAPTER XCIV
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire334-342
Story of the Brahman boy who offered himself up to save the life of the king335-341
CHAPTER XCV
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire342-347
Story of Anangamanjari, her husband Manivarman, and the Brahman Kamalakara342-347
CHAPTER XCVI
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire348-350
Story of the our Brahman brothers who resuscitated the tiger348-350
CHAPTER XCVII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire351-354
Story of the Hermit who first wept and then danced351-353
CHAPTER XCVIII
Continuation of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire354-358
Story of the father that married the daughter and the son that married the mother354-357
CHAPTER XCIX
Conclusion of the story of king Trivikramasena and the Vampire358-360
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and Sasankavati360-362
CHAPTER C.
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and Sasankavati362-365
CHAPTER CI
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and Sasankavati366-386
Story of Sundarasena and Mandaravati368-385
CHAPTER CII
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and Sasankavati87-396
CHAPTER CIII
Continuation of the story of Mrigankadatta and Sasankavati396-409
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son409
BOOK XIII
CHAPTER CIV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son411-423
Story of the two Brahman friends412-423
BOOK XIV
CHAPTER CV
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son425-430
Story of Savitri and Angiras426-427
CHAPTER CVI
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son441-418
Story of Rama442
CHAPTER CVIII
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son448-460
Story of Nagasvamin and the witches449-452
Story of Marubhuti and the mermaids and the gold-producing grains452-454
BOOK XV
CHAPTER CIX
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son461-460
History of the cave of Trisirsha464-465
CHAPTER CX
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son469-478
Naravahanadatta crowned emperor of the Vidyadharas473-474
BOOK XVI
CHAPTER CXI
Continuation of the story of Udayana and his son479-483
Story of the devoted couple Surasena and Sushena480-481
Doath of Chandamahasena and Angaravati482
Death of Udayana king of Vatsa483
Continuation of the story of Naravahanadatta son of Udayana484-485
CHAPTER CXII
Continuation of the story of Naravahanadatta son of Udayana485-497
Story of king Chandamahasena and the Asura's daughter486-488
Story of Prince Avantivardhana and the daughter of the Matanga488-496
Story of the young Chandala who married the daughter of king Prasenajit490-491
Story of the young fisherman who married a princess491-493
Story of the Merchant's daughter who fell in love with a thief493-495
CHAPTER CXIII
Continuation of the story of Naravahanadatta son of Udayana497-503
BOOK XVII
CHAPTER CXIV
Continuation of the story of Naravahanadatta son of Udayana505-513
Story of king Brahmadatta and the swans506-513
How Parvati condemned her five attendants to be reborn on earth508-510
Story of the metamorphoses of Pingesvara and Guhesvara519-513
CHAPTER CXV
Continuation of the story of Brahmadatta and the swans513-514
Story of Muktaphalaketu and Padmavati514-522
CHAPTER CXVI
Continuation of the story of Muktaphalaketu and Padmavati522-528
CHAPTER CXVII
Continuation of the story of Muktaphalaketu and Padmavati528-538
CHAPTER CXVIII
Continuation of the story of Muktaphalaketu Padmavati538-519
CHAPTER CXIX
Conclusion of the story of Muktaphalaketu and Padmavati519-561
Conclusion of the story of Brahmadatta and the swans561
Continuation of the story of Naravahanadatta son of Udayana561
BOOK XVIII
CHAPTER CXX
Continuation of the story of Naravahanadatta son of Udayana563
Story of Vikramaditya king of Ujjayini563-579
CHAPTER CXXI
Continuation of the story of Vikramaditya king of Ujjayini571-586
Story of Madanamanjari571-583
Story of the gambler Dagineya572-574
Story of Thinthakarala the bold gambler574-582
Story of the gambler who cheated Yama581
Story of Ghanta and Nighanta and the two maidens583
Story of the golden deer584
CHAPTER CXXIII
Continuation of the story of Vikramaditya king of Ujjayini593
Story of Kalingasena's marriage593-611
How Devasena obtained the magic ointment594
Story of the grateful monkey596-597
Story of the two princesses598-599
Story of Dhanadatta600-601
Story of Kesata and Kandarpa601-610
Story of Kusumayudha and Kamalalochana606-607
CHAPTER CXXIV
Conclusion of the story of Kalingasena's marriage611-614
Story of Chandrasvamin611-612
Conclusion of the story of Vikramaditya king of Ujjayini614-624
Story of Devasvamin616-617
Story of Agnisarman617-618
Story of Muladeva618-624
Conclusion of the story of Naravahanadatta son of Udayana624
Conclusion of the Katha Sarit Sagara625

From the Jacket :

Somadeva's Katha Sarit Sagara or Ocean of the Streams of Story is a work of early medieval literature. The work itself is a symbol of continuity of literary process, as it stems from the rather mysterious Brihat Katha of Gunadhya.

The Katha Sarit Sagara deals not so much with concrete historical events but with problems and processes of life, not so much with concrete historical personalities but mostly with concrete types of people, specific to the time in which Somadeva lived. But as he in his remarkable work reflected life of his time, we are in all earnest right to look for a real historical landscape in his work. We are very much helped by author himself who inspite of certain literary traditions, already canonized in his time, selected the way of Auchitya, the way of realistic imagery, so eloquently propounded by his predecessors.

Somadeva collected and presented to us in this work more than 350 stories – fairy tales, novels, short stories, fables, anecdotes etc., which were current among the people. He gave them brilliant form with full sense of Auchitya and also the appropriate dress. And from the literary point of view the Katha Sarit Sagara is real embodiment of the best achievements of the art and literature in early medieval India.

About the Author :

Charles Henry Tawney, Born 1837; Son of Rev. Richard Tawney: educated at Rugby and Trinity College, Cambridge: Scholar: Seniro Classic, 1860: Fellow of Trinity College, 1860: for many years Professor and President of the Presidency College, Calcutta, and Registrar of the Calcutta University: officiated thrice as Director of Public Instruction, Bengal: author of several translations from the Sanskrit: C.I.E.: Librarian of the Indian Office: retired 1903.


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