Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Shipping on All Items are Expected in 2-3 Weeks on account of the Coronavirus Pandemic
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Language and Literature > Maintenance of Punjabi Language in Delhi: A Sociolinguistic Study (An Old and Rare Book)
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Maintenance of Punjabi Language in Delhi: A Sociolinguistic Study (An Old and Rare Book)
Pages from the book
Maintenance of Punjabi Language in Delhi: A Sociolinguistic Study (An Old and Rare Book)
Look Inside the Book
Description
Preface

Hindi, Urdu, Punjabi in India have such structural similarities that linguists have gone to suggest that they are three manifestations of a single language. L. M. Khubchandani calls the entire North-Indian region as the HUP region. There was a time when Urdu was the language of education in the entire region. Whether it was due to imperial pressure or love of Urdu, religion was not a factor against Urdu education.

The ‘communal’ character of languages in India led to a situation where there were no sharp boundaries between languages and dialects. Even the language boundaries were fuzzy. Variety, which became focussed because of good literature, regal or religious support was treated as language. When it faded because of the shift in focus, it was treated as dialect. The inclusive logic permeating Indian thinking which permitted co-existence of different cultural entities helped the growth and maintenance of such a situation. Thus at times Awadhi, Braj, Maithili were treated as languages, at other times they were treated as dialects. For a variety of reasons Urdu remained focussed for a long time and was treated as a separate language."

For long time separate identity of Punjabi was questioned. Even the Sikh Gurus used Bhakha in the Grantha Saheb. But _ once religion was made a factor for separate identity, the language of religion naturally assumed a separate sanctity for its practitioners. In the case of Punjabi, since the language of Adi Grantha is not what is known as Punjabi now, it was the script which was . treated as the defining factor of the group. No wonder that in successive censuses, people of that region returned Gurumukhi as their mother tongue.

Adoption of the dominant regional language as culture language to be used in domains other than the intimate domains by minority and settlers was a natural thing. While Hindi provided a macro identity to a host of languages thus creating a loose dialect language relation, the Sindhi Hindi mother tongue label transfer, the Bengali-Assamese mother-tongue transfer in Assam and the declaration of regional languages as mother tongues by tribals and other minority groups was a natural process. The latest manifestation of this feature is in Abohar and Fazilka area, where the Wagadis once counted as Punjabi’s, declared themselves as Hindi speakers and upset the calculation of many political pundits.

It is in this context that maintenance studies in India have to. be seen. In India where determined minorities have retained their loyalty to their language under most inhospitable conditions as Saurashtri in Tamilnadu and people are willing to sacrifice their languages on the alter of privilege as in the case of those preferring English to the exclusion of their language. maintenance must be seen as a spectrum. Documentation of various contact situations, , differing attitudes of speakers towards each other’s language and the change 1 lingo-centric socio political behaviour over period of time is bound to provide fresh insights into the study of this phenomenon.

The present study is a contribution to this aspect of Socio-linguistics which has held the interest of scholars in different parts of the world. If this adds to the existing knowledge in the field, then our efforts would have been rewarded.

I congratulate all those responsible for the publication of this monograph.

**Contents and Sample Pages**















Maintenance of Punjabi Language in Delhi: A Sociolinguistic Study (An Old and Rare Book)

Item Code:
NAV917
Cover:
PAPERBACK
Edition:
1986
Language:
English
Size:
8.50 X 5.50 inch
Pages:
264
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 0.25 Kg
Price:
$23.00   Shipping Free
Shipping expected in 2 to 3 weeks
Look Inside the Book
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Maintenance of Punjabi Language in Delhi: A Sociolinguistic Study (An Old and Rare Book)

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 181 times since 15th Feb, 2020
Preface

Hindi, Urdu, Punjabi in India have such structural similarities that linguists have gone to suggest that they are three manifestations of a single language. L. M. Khubchandani calls the entire North-Indian region as the HUP region. There was a time when Urdu was the language of education in the entire region. Whether it was due to imperial pressure or love of Urdu, religion was not a factor against Urdu education.

The ‘communal’ character of languages in India led to a situation where there were no sharp boundaries between languages and dialects. Even the language boundaries were fuzzy. Variety, which became focussed because of good literature, regal or religious support was treated as language. When it faded because of the shift in focus, it was treated as dialect. The inclusive logic permeating Indian thinking which permitted co-existence of different cultural entities helped the growth and maintenance of such a situation. Thus at times Awadhi, Braj, Maithili were treated as languages, at other times they were treated as dialects. For a variety of reasons Urdu remained focussed for a long time and was treated as a separate language."

For long time separate identity of Punjabi was questioned. Even the Sikh Gurus used Bhakha in the Grantha Saheb. But _ once religion was made a factor for separate identity, the language of religion naturally assumed a separate sanctity for its practitioners. In the case of Punjabi, since the language of Adi Grantha is not what is known as Punjabi now, it was the script which was . treated as the defining factor of the group. No wonder that in successive censuses, people of that region returned Gurumukhi as their mother tongue.

Adoption of the dominant regional language as culture language to be used in domains other than the intimate domains by minority and settlers was a natural thing. While Hindi provided a macro identity to a host of languages thus creating a loose dialect language relation, the Sindhi Hindi mother tongue label transfer, the Bengali-Assamese mother-tongue transfer in Assam and the declaration of regional languages as mother tongues by tribals and other minority groups was a natural process. The latest manifestation of this feature is in Abohar and Fazilka area, where the Wagadis once counted as Punjabi’s, declared themselves as Hindi speakers and upset the calculation of many political pundits.

It is in this context that maintenance studies in India have to. be seen. In India where determined minorities have retained their loyalty to their language under most inhospitable conditions as Saurashtri in Tamilnadu and people are willing to sacrifice their languages on the alter of privilege as in the case of those preferring English to the exclusion of their language. maintenance must be seen as a spectrum. Documentation of various contact situations, , differing attitudes of speakers towards each other’s language and the change 1 lingo-centric socio political behaviour over period of time is bound to provide fresh insights into the study of this phenomenon.

The present study is a contribution to this aspect of Socio-linguistics which has held the interest of scholars in different parts of the world. If this adds to the existing knowledge in the field, then our efforts would have been rewarded.

I congratulate all those responsible for the publication of this monograph.

**Contents and Sample Pages**















Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to Maintenance of Punjabi Language in Delhi: A Sociolinguistic Study (An... (Language and Literature | Books)

The Influence of English on Marathi (A Sociolinguistic and Stylistic Study)
Deal 20% Off
by Bhalchandra Nemade
Paperback (Edition: 2014)
Popular Prakashan Pvt. Ltd
Item Code: NAM453
$26.00$20.80
You save: $5.20 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Aspects of Language (Set of 9 Books)
Deal 30% Off
Paperback (Edition: 2009)
Indira Gandhi National Open University
Item Code: NAI161
$90.00$63.00
You save: $27.00 (30%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Ideology and Status of Sanskrit: Contributions To The History of The Sanskrit Language
Deal 20% Off
Item Code: NAE281
$36.00$28.80
You save: $7.20 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Idioms in Kasika (An Old Book)
Deal 20% Off
by Radha Madhab Dash
HARDCOVER (Edition: 1996)
Pratibha Prakashan
Item Code: NAP946
$72.00$57.60
You save: $14.40 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Reading in English Language Teaching in India
Deal 20% Off
by S. Kudchedkar
Paperback (Edition: 2013)
Orient Blackswan Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAJ215
$36.00$28.80
You save: $7.20 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Structure and Development of Middle Indo-Aryan Dialects
Item Code: IDD397
$31.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
History of Malayalam Language (An Old and Rare Book)
by K.M. Prabhakara Variar
Hardcover (Edition: 1985)
University of Madras
Item Code: NAK343
$31.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Modern Kannada Grammar (With Transliteration)
Item Code: NAM963
$36.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
An Intermediate Course Reader in Kannada (A Rare Book)
Item Code: NAK157
$31.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Byangsi Grammar and Vocabulary
Deal 20% Off
Item Code: NAM205
$26.00$20.80
You save: $5.20 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Studies in Linguistics
Item Code: NAH462
$21.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Essays on South India
Deal 20% Off
Item Code: IDD822
$26.00$20.80
You save: $5.20 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
I have received my parcel from postman. Very good service. So, Once again heartfully thank you so much to Exotic India.
Parag, India
My previous purchasing order has safely arrived. I'm impressed. My trust and confidence in your business still firmly, highly maintained. I've now become your regular customer, and looking forward to ordering some more in the near future.
Chamras, Thailand
Excellent website with vast variety of goods to view and purchase, especially Books and Idols of Hindu Deities are amongst my favourite. Have purchased many items over the years from you with great expectation and pleasure and received them promptly as advertised. A Great admirer of goods on sale on your website, will definately return to purchase further items in future. Thank you Exotic India.
Ani, UK
Thank you for such wonderful books on the Divine.
Stevie, USA
I have bought several exquisite sculptures from Exotic India, and I have never been disappointed. I am looking forward to adding this unusual cobra to my collection.
Janice, USA
My statues arrived today ….they are beautiful. Time has stopped in my home since I have unwrapped them!! I look forward to continuing our relationship and adding more beauty and divinity to my home.
Joseph, USA
I recently received a book I ordered from you that I could not find anywhere else. Thank you very much for being such a great resource and for your remarkably fast shipping/delivery.
Prof. Adam, USA
Thank you for your expertise in shipping as none of my Buddhas have been damaged and they are beautiful.
Roberta, Australia
Very organized & easy to find a product website! I have bought item here in the past & am very satisfied! Thank you!
Suzanne, USA
This is a very nicely-done website and shopping for my 'Ashtavakra Gita' (a Bangla one, no less) was easy. Thanks!
Shurjendu, USA
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2020 © Exotic India