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Books > Language and Literature > Children > Pancatantram (An Exhaustive Introduction, English Translation with Original Sanskrit Text and Index of Verses)
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Pancatantram (An Exhaustive Introduction, English Translation with Original Sanskrit Text and Index of Verses)
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Pancatantram (An Exhaustive Introduction, English Translation with Original Sanskrit Text and Index of Verses)
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About the Book

How do societies come to terms with dispossession, loss, nomadic existence, and protracted displacement? What does it mean to be a refugee in one’s own state? Centring on these questions, the current volume seeks to explore the lives of the Kashmiri Pandits—the Hindu Pandit minority of Kashmir Valley—and their — experience of forced migration and the conflict over Jammu and Kashmir.

Since 1989, Jammu and Kashmir has been affected by conflict between the Indian state and a movement demanding independence. As a result of this conflict, thousands of Kashmiri Pandits fled the valley and sought refuge in different parts of India, especially Jammu and New Delhi. Addressing the themes of violence, suffering, and victimhood in the context of forced migration, On Uncertain Ground explores the experiences of Kashmiri Pandits as they rebuild their lives after __ displacement, and their relationship to the Indian state and Indian and Kashmiri nationalisms. Focusing on ‘camp colonies’ and the lives of Kashmiri Pandits across Jammu and New Delhi, this book reveals the tension between the recovery of everyday life and the inability to feel at home and find one’s place in the world.

About the Author

Ankur Datta is a social anthropologist and teaches at the Department of Sociology, South Asian University, New Delhi. He completed his masters at the School of Oriental and African Studies, London, and his PhD at the London School of Economics and Political Science, London. He was raised in Singapore, Calcutta, and Mumbai. He has also lived in the city of Jammu where he conducted his fieldwork among the Kashmiri Pandits who have been displaced by the conflict in the Kashmir Valley. His work addresses questions of displacement and dis- location, place-making, and the politics of victimhood. He has a larger interest in exploring how people locate themselves in the world and in the context of complex histories. He has published articles based on his research journals ranging from Contributions to Indian Sociology to Forced Migration Review and Seminar.

Introduction

Sir william Jones (1746-94), the father of Indology and a linguistic genius, in his discourse on the Hindus, observed that they said to have laid claim to three inventions—the game of chess, the decimal scale of notation and the mode of instructing by apologues. This observation stands true as India has been a land of cheerful people where, in the words of A.L. Basham ‘each finding a niche in a complex and slowly evolving social system, reached a higher level of kindliness and gentleness in their mutual relationships than any other nation of antiquity.’ Prior to this statement, he records his impression regarding the jovial and care- free attitude of Indians in following words :

‘The European student who concentrates on religious texts of a certain type may well gain the impression that ancient India was a land of "‘life negating" ascetics, imposing their gloomy and sterile ideas upon the trusting millions who were their lay followers. The fallacy of this impression is quite evident from the secular literature, sculpture and painting of the time. The average Indian, though he mignt pay a lip-service to the ascetic and respect his ideals, did not find life a vale of tears from which to escape at all costs; rather he was willing to accept the world as he found it, and to extract what happiness he could from it.’[The wonder that was India, Intro. P.9]

This liveliness of ancient culture is well-expressed through a long tradition of the timeless jewels of the myths, legends, fairy tales and fables-which survive in the rich and abundant store-house of sanskrit literature. The ancient sages and poets of this nation invested the didactic themes and traditional beliefs with beautiful symbolism and used them as mediums of profound ethical and moral suggestions. The most striking feature of ancient Indian civilization has been the element of humanity combined with a sense of duty and practicality. And, this quality has been well- expressed through the colossal Sanskrit literature e-compassing a wide range of sententious apologues and fables and fairy tales. There also exists an extensive literature in political and moral philosophy, that tends to reflect the most insightful meditation and the profound reflections on human destiny. This has been the central value, marking the genre from it’s beginning, and a source of incomparable pleasure and sustenance to those connoeisseurs with the insight and cultural training to appreciate and learn from it.

Prior to an introduction to the Pancatantra, we deem it proper to precede with the strong back-ground it had. Sanskrit language is the repertory of an extensive literature having a perennial source in its antiquity. It has an un-decayed and continued tradition of fables, folk-tales, fairy-tales and sententious narratives (Katha, Akhyanas) that left indelible impression not only on Indian literature but has also immensely influenced world-literature. The three great religious sects of India, viz. Vedic, Jaina and Buddhist- have for the wide dissemination of their tenets, used numerous fables and narratives. These sects own huge treasure of fables and parables where the ultimate motif is not only to expound the religious purports of these sects but also to throw ample light on the importance of practical wisdom. The timeless treatises, belonging to this genre, verily represent the Sanskrit literature on ethics and jurisprudence and are rooted deep in antiquity.

Preface

Pt. Hazari Prasad Dwidedi, the accomplished author and doyen of Hindi-Sanskrit critics, had once rightly remarked that the Bhagavad-Gita and the Meghaduta are like the bells in the temple of lord Visvandatha that are invariably struck at least once in life- time by every visitor (Meghadita : Ek Purani kahani). In the opinion of the present authors, this enumeration would have emerged more compact as well as balanced, had he incorporated the Pancatantra also. Truly, it is only the indomitable life-spirit and the un-conquer able inner-strength of a text that help it attract the minds of the readers in all ages.

On the basis of its content, the Pancatantra of Srivisnu Sarman can not be regarded as a textbook of political science in the modern sense of the term . But, undoubtedly, a good part of it is related to politics. We find the author making a free and deliberate attempt to free politics from the influence of religion and morality at the risk of being labelled sometimes as ‘Machievellian’ and preaching craft and deceit. The text was intended mainly for the instruction and training of the nascent kings and ministers in the art of governance. To achieve his purpose and to have a broader reach, the author of this classic has not hesitated in digesting the views of his predecessors, viz. Kautilya, Kamandaka, Sukra and Vedavydsa to name a few. The reason for it being that the prevalent form of government was monarchy. But, apart from its political purport, Pancatantra is about human concerns and tendencies to evaluate one’s well-being by comparing it with that of another. It deals with mora! instructions, human tendencies, weaknesses, desire to flourish and, above all, being pragmatic in worldly pursuits. In this age of speed and restlessness, unquenchable desire for having plenty of riches at all costs, and, utter immorality, the intent, content and implication of this timeless text bespeak its relevance and indispensability.

**Contents and Sample Pages**















Pancatantram (An Exhaustive Introduction, English Translation with Original Sanskrit Text and Index of Verses)

Item Code:
NAS030
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PAPERBACK
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2016
ISBN:
9788193077962
Language:
English
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8.50 X 5.50 inch
Pages:
822
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Weight of the Book: 0.93 Kg
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About the Book

How do societies come to terms with dispossession, loss, nomadic existence, and protracted displacement? What does it mean to be a refugee in one’s own state? Centring on these questions, the current volume seeks to explore the lives of the Kashmiri Pandits—the Hindu Pandit minority of Kashmir Valley—and their — experience of forced migration and the conflict over Jammu and Kashmir.

Since 1989, Jammu and Kashmir has been affected by conflict between the Indian state and a movement demanding independence. As a result of this conflict, thousands of Kashmiri Pandits fled the valley and sought refuge in different parts of India, especially Jammu and New Delhi. Addressing the themes of violence, suffering, and victimhood in the context of forced migration, On Uncertain Ground explores the experiences of Kashmiri Pandits as they rebuild their lives after __ displacement, and their relationship to the Indian state and Indian and Kashmiri nationalisms. Focusing on ‘camp colonies’ and the lives of Kashmiri Pandits across Jammu and New Delhi, this book reveals the tension between the recovery of everyday life and the inability to feel at home and find one’s place in the world.

About the Author

Ankur Datta is a social anthropologist and teaches at the Department of Sociology, South Asian University, New Delhi. He completed his masters at the School of Oriental and African Studies, London, and his PhD at the London School of Economics and Political Science, London. He was raised in Singapore, Calcutta, and Mumbai. He has also lived in the city of Jammu where he conducted his fieldwork among the Kashmiri Pandits who have been displaced by the conflict in the Kashmir Valley. His work addresses questions of displacement and dis- location, place-making, and the politics of victimhood. He has a larger interest in exploring how people locate themselves in the world and in the context of complex histories. He has published articles based on his research journals ranging from Contributions to Indian Sociology to Forced Migration Review and Seminar.

Introduction

Sir william Jones (1746-94), the father of Indology and a linguistic genius, in his discourse on the Hindus, observed that they said to have laid claim to three inventions—the game of chess, the decimal scale of notation and the mode of instructing by apologues. This observation stands true as India has been a land of cheerful people where, in the words of A.L. Basham ‘each finding a niche in a complex and slowly evolving social system, reached a higher level of kindliness and gentleness in their mutual relationships than any other nation of antiquity.’ Prior to this statement, he records his impression regarding the jovial and care- free attitude of Indians in following words :

‘The European student who concentrates on religious texts of a certain type may well gain the impression that ancient India was a land of "‘life negating" ascetics, imposing their gloomy and sterile ideas upon the trusting millions who were their lay followers. The fallacy of this impression is quite evident from the secular literature, sculpture and painting of the time. The average Indian, though he mignt pay a lip-service to the ascetic and respect his ideals, did not find life a vale of tears from which to escape at all costs; rather he was willing to accept the world as he found it, and to extract what happiness he could from it.’[The wonder that was India, Intro. P.9]

This liveliness of ancient culture is well-expressed through a long tradition of the timeless jewels of the myths, legends, fairy tales and fables-which survive in the rich and abundant store-house of sanskrit literature. The ancient sages and poets of this nation invested the didactic themes and traditional beliefs with beautiful symbolism and used them as mediums of profound ethical and moral suggestions. The most striking feature of ancient Indian civilization has been the element of humanity combined with a sense of duty and practicality. And, this quality has been well- expressed through the colossal Sanskrit literature e-compassing a wide range of sententious apologues and fables and fairy tales. There also exists an extensive literature in political and moral philosophy, that tends to reflect the most insightful meditation and the profound reflections on human destiny. This has been the central value, marking the genre from it’s beginning, and a source of incomparable pleasure and sustenance to those connoeisseurs with the insight and cultural training to appreciate and learn from it.

Prior to an introduction to the Pancatantra, we deem it proper to precede with the strong back-ground it had. Sanskrit language is the repertory of an extensive literature having a perennial source in its antiquity. It has an un-decayed and continued tradition of fables, folk-tales, fairy-tales and sententious narratives (Katha, Akhyanas) that left indelible impression not only on Indian literature but has also immensely influenced world-literature. The three great religious sects of India, viz. Vedic, Jaina and Buddhist- have for the wide dissemination of their tenets, used numerous fables and narratives. These sects own huge treasure of fables and parables where the ultimate motif is not only to expound the religious purports of these sects but also to throw ample light on the importance of practical wisdom. The timeless treatises, belonging to this genre, verily represent the Sanskrit literature on ethics and jurisprudence and are rooted deep in antiquity.

Preface

Pt. Hazari Prasad Dwidedi, the accomplished author and doyen of Hindi-Sanskrit critics, had once rightly remarked that the Bhagavad-Gita and the Meghaduta are like the bells in the temple of lord Visvandatha that are invariably struck at least once in life- time by every visitor (Meghadita : Ek Purani kahani). In the opinion of the present authors, this enumeration would have emerged more compact as well as balanced, had he incorporated the Pancatantra also. Truly, it is only the indomitable life-spirit and the un-conquer able inner-strength of a text that help it attract the minds of the readers in all ages.

On the basis of its content, the Pancatantra of Srivisnu Sarman can not be regarded as a textbook of political science in the modern sense of the term . But, undoubtedly, a good part of it is related to politics. We find the author making a free and deliberate attempt to free politics from the influence of religion and morality at the risk of being labelled sometimes as ‘Machievellian’ and preaching craft and deceit. The text was intended mainly for the instruction and training of the nascent kings and ministers in the art of governance. To achieve his purpose and to have a broader reach, the author of this classic has not hesitated in digesting the views of his predecessors, viz. Kautilya, Kamandaka, Sukra and Vedavydsa to name a few. The reason for it being that the prevalent form of government was monarchy. But, apart from its political purport, Pancatantra is about human concerns and tendencies to evaluate one’s well-being by comparing it with that of another. It deals with mora! instructions, human tendencies, weaknesses, desire to flourish and, above all, being pragmatic in worldly pursuits. In this age of speed and restlessness, unquenchable desire for having plenty of riches at all costs, and, utter immorality, the intent, content and implication of this timeless text bespeak its relevance and indispensability.

**Contents and Sample Pages**















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