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Sacred Songs of India - Vol. I

Sacred Songs of India - Vol. I
$29.00
Item Code: IDE511
Author: V.K. Subramanian
Publisher: Abhinav Publication
Language: Sanskrit Text with Transliteration and English Translation
Edition: 1996
ISBN: 8170173213
Pages: 320
Cover: Hardcover
Other Details: 8.8" X 5.8"
weight of the book:520 gms

From the Jacket:

THE SACRED SONGS OF INDIA encompasses selections from the lifework of ten mystic musician-saints of India, spanning twelve centuries. These poet sages came from different regions of India and sang in different languages, but the theme central to their songs is love and devotion towards their favourite Deity: Krishna, who is also Rama. The songs of Andal, the daughter of the south Indian temple priest who lived in the 7th century A.D. and of Meera, the Rajasthani princes who lived in the 16th century are both suffused with bridal mysticism. The songs of Vidyapati and Jayadeva are similar in their erotic imagery of the love of Radha and Krishna. Tulsidas, who sang in Varanasi in the north and Tyagaraja, who sang in Tiruvaiyar in deep south, in different languages and in different centuries were similar in their approach to their darling Deity, Rama. Surdas, Tukaram and Purandharadasa felt themselves to be the servants of their Master: Krishna. Kabir, while he sang of the glory of Rama, also philosophical about the transience of material life and the permanence of the Almighty.

Andal sang in Tamil, Tyagaraja in Telugu, Purandharadasa in Kannada, Tukaram in Marathi, Jayadeva in Sanskti and the others in various dialects of Hindi, but the thread of God-intoxicated devotion binds them all.

The SACRED SONGS OF INDIA will be an inexhaustible repertoire for any musician, singer, choreographer, dancer or drama and ballet groups.

It will also be a source of inspiration, spiritual and aesthetic, to all Indians, wherever they may be, in the continents of Euro-Asia, Africa or the continents across the Atlantic.

About The Author:

Vadakaymadom Krishnaiyer Subramanian (b. 1930, Kerala) is an eminent Indian scholar, whose life mission is to present to the world treasures of ancient Indian literature and cultural heritage. He has already translated several ancient texts into English. These include: Saundaryalahari, Sivanadalahari, Sri Rudraprasna, Maxims of Chanakya and SivaSakti.

Subramanian has a universalistic taste and is a prolific writer on a variety of subjects ranging from astrology to art. He has also written a few works of fiction.

A retired officer of the Indian Audit and Accounts Service (which he joined in 1953), Subramanian is also a reputed painter, who has held twenty-two one-man shows. His paintings have won wide acclaim from leading art critics of India

Subramanian, who has travelled extensively in Indian, now lives in the United States of America.

Introduction

The sacred songs of India, included ill this book, are an arbitrary, incomplete, whimsical selection, spanning twelve centuries and covering various regions of India.

The only running thread in these songs is devotion to the chosen Deity: Krishna who is also Rama.

The saints who have composed these songs were all mystic poets who dreamed of their beloved deity in uninhibited imagery.

Both Andal-who was born in the South in the seventh century, the daughter of a temple priest-and Meera, the royal princess of Rajasthan who lived in the fifteenth-sixteenth centuries-desired union with Krishna and sang of Him as the Lover.

Jayadeva, the Orissan poet of the 12th century and Vidyapati, the Bihari saint of the 14th century, infused their songs with profuse eroticism about the love of Radha and Krishna-joy in union and sorrow in separation-Radha and Krishna being symbols of the individual soul and the Supreme Spirit.

Purandharadasa, Surdas and Tukaram treated themselves as the servants of the Lord and sang of the glories of their Master.

Kabir 's songs are more philosophical in content, though rich in devotion.

Tulsidas and Tyagaraja blindly adored their Rama and sang of His glories with unparalleled intimacy.

The beauty of these songs has transcended the barriers of language, region and time.

CONTENTS

 

  Introduction 9-10
  Acknowledgements 11
1. Songs of Andal (7th century A. D.) -30 Songs 11
2. Songs of Jayadeva (12th century A. D.) -10 Songs 13-75
3. Songs of Vidyapati (14th-15th century A. D.) - 10 Songs 77-123
4. Songs of Kabir (15th-16th century A. D.) -10 Songs 125-147
5. Songs of Meera (15th-16th century A. D.) -10 Songs 149-171
6. Songs of Purandharadasa (15th-16th century A. D.) -10 Songs 173-195
7. Songs of Surdas (15th-16th century A. D.) -10 Songs 245-267
8. Songs of Tulsidas (16th-17th century A. D.) -10 Songs 245-267
9. Songs of Tukaram (17th century A. D.) -10 Songs 269-291
10. Songs of Tyagaraja (18th-19th century A. D.) -10 Songs 293-321

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