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Books > Hindu > Gods > Shiva > Stories I Told My Daughter (About Shiva )
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Stories I Told My Daughter (About Shiva )
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Stories I Told My Daughter (About Shiva )
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Description
About the Books

He drinks poison

He begs

He competes with his wife

He becomes a guru to his wife

He becomes a student of his son

He reduces the god of love to ashes

He reduces three entire cities to ashes

He saves a devotee from death

He runs from a devotee

He is a half eon-half woman

He is the endless column of fire

This book is a collection of short stories about Lord Shiva. Each story is followed by a short discussion, an analysis-of-sorts, where the author reflects on life lessons that can be learnt from Lord Shiva's stories.

Read and get valuable takeaways from each story.

About the Author

Prameela Ethiraj is an engineer and works for her husband's consultancy firm.

She loves reading, writing and listening to Carnatic music.

Preface

It was my daughter who suggested I write all the stories I had told her over the years. She believed that many other children could enjoy and also benefit from these stories. A chance remark by my husband during one of our story sessions set us, mother and daughter, discussing each story and learning from it. So, I have also included our discussions.

This book of stories is about Shiva.

The stories are all popular ones. What is new here is a short discussion, an analysis of sorts, where I look at life lessons from the stories. I have told the story first. Next, follows the "takeaways".

I have also included pictures of sculptures from our temples, wherever possible, appreciating the unique way our ancestors told their stories, despite the absence of paper, printers and other paraphernalia. I hope that these stories will inspire and touch those who choose to read this book.

Introduction

Lord Shiva is one of the Trimurthis (Trinity) of the Hindu pantheon of gods, highly revered and worshipped in the form of the lingam.

His role is that of the destroyer. But there are tales galore which indicate that he is the supreme saviour.

He saved the universe by drinking the extremely potent poison halahala. In the story "Shiva drinks the halahala", we see that we have to overcome many hurdles in life before we achieve our goal.

He saved the Earth from being destroyed by the tremendous force of Ganga descending from Heaven to Earth. In "Shiva tames the Ganga", Bhagiratha shows us that supreme effort is required to see the desired results in any endeavour.

He saved the universe from Lord Narasimha's rage which did not abate after killing Hiranyakashipu. He saved the world from his own son, Andhakasura.

He is the yogi (ascetic), but he is also the grihasta (householder). He is Ardhanarishwara who is half man -half woman. "Ardhanarishwara" tells us to always respect each other for our attributes, our strengths, be it male or female.

He grieves for his dead wife Sati. The story "Shiva grieves for Sati" makes us realise that one should introspect infinite times before even contemplating an extreme step like suicide.

He belittles the role of a kitchen and gets reduced to begging for alms from his wife (Parvati as Annapoorna). "Shiva begs" tells us that food is what gives us the nourishment and energy for all our pursuits.

"Shiva competes with Parvati" strives to remind us that when we are in the position of a judge, we must bear in mind the total scenario, not just one incident.

He is the supreme guru Dakshinamurthi. In "Shiva marries a fisherwoman", he is guru to his wife Parvati, though not giving enough leeway for the shortcomings (if we can call it so) of his student.

He is also the student, learning the pranava mantra from his own son Subrahmanya. He is the naked beggar who makes the group of rishis at Daruka vana understand the power of divine grace. It is at this time that he acquires his attributes of tiger skin, snakes around his neck and on his arms, the fierce dwarf Apasmara upon whom he rests one leg and dances, the trishula (trident), the deer and the fire.

Among one of his most referred attribute is his third eye-agni netra, which gives him the name of Tryambakam (one with three eyes). When he opens his agni netra, something is bound to happen. "Shiva reduces Kama to ashes", by opening his third eye, is eye openers to the friend who acts as the go-between and helps lovers unite.

He gives his devotees the boons they seek. ,p> He saves Markandeya from Yama himself and gives him immortality.

He dances the Tandava for Patanjali. He gives tiger feet to Vyaghrapada. The stories on Patanjali and Vyaghrapada are about the time it takes to realise our dreams.

As Nataraja (lord of dance), he changes his posture, respecting a king's concern for him.

Sometimes he tests the devotee before he gives. "Shiva-the hunter" tested Arjuna, the greatest archer of the time, before giving him a destructive weapon. Arjuna, striving to acquire the weapon, shows us that we have to anticipate the changes in technology and upgrade our skills.

He is Bhola Shankar. Sometimes he gives without thinking twice about it. "Shiva runs from his devotee" illustrates what happens when you give without thinking.

He gives his atmalinga to Ravana, but presses down the entire Kailasa Mountain on the same asura king when he arrogantly lifts the mountain. He showered his grace and protected the asuras of Tripura; but reduced to ashes the same Tripura when the asuras stopped following dharma.

He beheaded Brahma and atoned for it. He causes Chandra to wax and wane. He blessed Rama with victory when he set out to Lanka for the war against Ravana. He gave the weapon Sudarshana chakra to Lord Vishnu.

He is also the infinite column of fire! The Supreme One!

**Contents and Sample Pages**









Stories I Told My Daughter (About Shiva )

Item Code:
NAR192
Cover:
PAPERBACK
Edition:
2018
Publisher:
ISBN:
9781644292136
Language:
English
Size:
8.00 X 5.00 inch
Pages:
120 (15 B/W Illustrations)
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 0.12 Kg
Price:
$15.00   Shipping Free
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About the Books

He drinks poison

He begs

He competes with his wife

He becomes a guru to his wife

He becomes a student of his son

He reduces the god of love to ashes

He reduces three entire cities to ashes

He saves a devotee from death

He runs from a devotee

He is a half eon-half woman

He is the endless column of fire

This book is a collection of short stories about Lord Shiva. Each story is followed by a short discussion, an analysis-of-sorts, where the author reflects on life lessons that can be learnt from Lord Shiva's stories.

Read and get valuable takeaways from each story.

About the Author

Prameela Ethiraj is an engineer and works for her husband's consultancy firm.

She loves reading, writing and listening to Carnatic music.

Preface

It was my daughter who suggested I write all the stories I had told her over the years. She believed that many other children could enjoy and also benefit from these stories. A chance remark by my husband during one of our story sessions set us, mother and daughter, discussing each story and learning from it. So, I have also included our discussions.

This book of stories is about Shiva.

The stories are all popular ones. What is new here is a short discussion, an analysis of sorts, where I look at life lessons from the stories. I have told the story first. Next, follows the "takeaways".

I have also included pictures of sculptures from our temples, wherever possible, appreciating the unique way our ancestors told their stories, despite the absence of paper, printers and other paraphernalia. I hope that these stories will inspire and touch those who choose to read this book.

Introduction

Lord Shiva is one of the Trimurthis (Trinity) of the Hindu pantheon of gods, highly revered and worshipped in the form of the lingam.

His role is that of the destroyer. But there are tales galore which indicate that he is the supreme saviour.

He saved the universe by drinking the extremely potent poison halahala. In the story "Shiva drinks the halahala", we see that we have to overcome many hurdles in life before we achieve our goal.

He saved the Earth from being destroyed by the tremendous force of Ganga descending from Heaven to Earth. In "Shiva tames the Ganga", Bhagiratha shows us that supreme effort is required to see the desired results in any endeavour.

He saved the universe from Lord Narasimha's rage which did not abate after killing Hiranyakashipu. He saved the world from his own son, Andhakasura.

He is the yogi (ascetic), but he is also the grihasta (householder). He is Ardhanarishwara who is half man -half woman. "Ardhanarishwara" tells us to always respect each other for our attributes, our strengths, be it male or female.

He grieves for his dead wife Sati. The story "Shiva grieves for Sati" makes us realise that one should introspect infinite times before even contemplating an extreme step like suicide.

He belittles the role of a kitchen and gets reduced to begging for alms from his wife (Parvati as Annapoorna). "Shiva begs" tells us that food is what gives us the nourishment and energy for all our pursuits.

"Shiva competes with Parvati" strives to remind us that when we are in the position of a judge, we must bear in mind the total scenario, not just one incident.

He is the supreme guru Dakshinamurthi. In "Shiva marries a fisherwoman", he is guru to his wife Parvati, though not giving enough leeway for the shortcomings (if we can call it so) of his student.

He is also the student, learning the pranava mantra from his own son Subrahmanya. He is the naked beggar who makes the group of rishis at Daruka vana understand the power of divine grace. It is at this time that he acquires his attributes of tiger skin, snakes around his neck and on his arms, the fierce dwarf Apasmara upon whom he rests one leg and dances, the trishula (trident), the deer and the fire.

Among one of his most referred attribute is his third eye-agni netra, which gives him the name of Tryambakam (one with three eyes). When he opens his agni netra, something is bound to happen. "Shiva reduces Kama to ashes", by opening his third eye, is eye openers to the friend who acts as the go-between and helps lovers unite.

He gives his devotees the boons they seek. ,p> He saves Markandeya from Yama himself and gives him immortality.

He dances the Tandava for Patanjali. He gives tiger feet to Vyaghrapada. The stories on Patanjali and Vyaghrapada are about the time it takes to realise our dreams.

As Nataraja (lord of dance), he changes his posture, respecting a king's concern for him.

Sometimes he tests the devotee before he gives. "Shiva-the hunter" tested Arjuna, the greatest archer of the time, before giving him a destructive weapon. Arjuna, striving to acquire the weapon, shows us that we have to anticipate the changes in technology and upgrade our skills.

He is Bhola Shankar. Sometimes he gives without thinking twice about it. "Shiva runs from his devotee" illustrates what happens when you give without thinking.

He gives his atmalinga to Ravana, but presses down the entire Kailasa Mountain on the same asura king when he arrogantly lifts the mountain. He showered his grace and protected the asuras of Tripura; but reduced to ashes the same Tripura when the asuras stopped following dharma.

He beheaded Brahma and atoned for it. He causes Chandra to wax and wane. He blessed Rama with victory when he set out to Lanka for the war against Ravana. He gave the weapon Sudarshana chakra to Lord Vishnu.

He is also the infinite column of fire! The Supreme One!

**Contents and Sample Pages**









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