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Showing 1341 to 1350 of 1354 results
Showing 1341 to 1350 of 1354 results
The Gorgeous-Eyed Rajarajeshwari (Tripura Sundari)
The Devi Rajarajeshwari is known by the name Kamakshi down South where this exquisite bronze has been fashioned. In Sanskrit it means 'one possessing the eyes of love'. Her devotees find all the love and blessing they need in Her famous gaze, which is why none of Her four hands are in the popular abhaya or ashirvaad mudra. She bears a sprig of sugarcane in one hand, indicative of sweetness and nourishment. Her beauteous brow is set off by the sculpted length of Her sharp nose and the roseate lips where it ends. Her round full-cheeked face is complemented by the towering crown sitting on Her head, a typical characteristic of South Indian iconography. The sliver of moon attached to the same gives away her Shaivite lineage. The ribbed halo, a relatively austere aspect of this particular portrayal, is in stark contrast to the gorgeousness of Her shringar - gigantic kundalas, chunky necpieces, and lots of bangles. In one of Her hands She holds the signature sugracane. Unlike other female deities of the Hindu pantheon, Rajarajeshwari is sitting in moolbandha, the ample pleats of Her saree cascading down the inverted lotus pedestal.

The composition is such as to be more than an icon. It is a portable temple of the devi. The inverted lotus She is sitting on is placed on a layered platform that is highly aesthetically appealing. She is flanked by a couple of lions that gaze straight ahead with the same stateliness as their mistress. The aureole that seemingly contains the composition is adorned with traditional faunal motifs such as horses, elephants, and peacock, not to mention the ferocious kirtimukha carved at the very top. The unusual, jawless kirtimukha motif recurs in Indian visual art since the fourth century, and stands for the cyclical and destructive nature of time. Equally ornate legs hold the complete bronze structure in place.

Tandava On The Tiger (Made In Nepal)
The local word 'li' is a versatile syllable. It designates the vast range of metals, of diverse origins, levels of refinement, and blends, that constitute a medium of sculpture in the region (Central Asia, Kashmir, Tibet, and Nepal). Done using either repousse (hammering and putting into shape) or lost-wax casting (pouring molten li into a clay cast to replace the wax within), most of the art that is produced in this part of the world draws from the Hindu and Buddhist faiths. This one is a fine example of the same. Sculpted from copper, an elite medium for the visual arts when compared to brass, it depicts Shiva in the midst of His tandava.

There is so much about this unusual composition that conforms to the iconography of this much-venerated deity. His dense locks are gathered atop His head, upon which is the distinct roop of Devi Ganga and secured with a sliver of the moon. Myth has it that She descended onto the North Indian plains from the tresses of the lord, sweeping it with abundance and fertility. The hem of the loincloth grazes His knee, leaving the rest of the legs bare. On one hand is the characteristic trishool, the all-important damroo in the other. Beneath His dancing feet is the skin of a tiger brought to its knees by the lord. Note the snakes that are coiled around His ankles and neck, the stripes of vibhooti that grace His brow, and the superbly pronounced composure of countenance, putting together a picture of overpowering ferocity.

6" The Beauty Of Dashabhuja Kali in Brass | Handmade | Made In India
  • Amazing Red Gold
  • Double Chola
  • Brown Gold
  • Natural Brass
  • Antique Green
  • Silver Gold
  • Green Chola
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6" The Beauty Of Dashabhuja Kali in Brass | Handmade | Made In India
The beauty of the Devi Kali lies in Her ferocity and invincibility. The very picture of Her is enough to make the adharmee tremble with fear. Each of Her ten arms ('dasha' in Sanskrit means 'ten'; 'bhuja', 'arm') bears a deadly weapon of divine prowess. She uses them to slay adharmees, whose severed heads are hanging in the garland that hangs down Her neck all the way to Her thigh (myth has it that the number of heads in this signature garland derives from the Sanskrit varnamala or alphabet). A skirt of severed arms exposes Her long legs, a token of the samarpan (offering) of one's karma-yoga made by Her devotees. With one feet She pins down Her husband, the destroyer of the universe, the lord Shiva Himself, who lies there with a knee and a hand, clasped around the damru, raised. Her gaze is fierce, Her tongue exposed in a gesture of bloodthirsty endeavour.

Despite the fearsome iconography, Kali Devi is not devoid of beauty. Her musculature is lissome; Her tresses so luscious it is enough to clothe Her usually naked person. Her shringar becomes Her status as the wife of Shiva - chunky amulets and wristlets for each of Her ten arms, anklets that weigh upon the torso of Shiva beneath Her feet, and ample necklaces and kundalas. The dharmic devotee discovers on Her stern brow the solace of maternal protection. Note how Her third eye has been engraved onto Her forehead, right below the hem of the haloed crown. A dual-layered aureole frames the composition, with a layer of lotus petals jutting outwards and a sequence of waves along the inner edges. The calm Shiva lies outstretched on a thick lotus pedestal, a panel engraved with wave-like curves separating Him from the petals.

12" The Exquisite Rudratandava In Brass | Handmade | Made In India
  • Indian Cocoa
  • Antique
  • Antique Brown
  • Patina Gold
  • Green Chola
  • Amazing Green Chola
  • Chola
  • Natural Brass
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12" The Exquisite Rudratandava In Brass | Handmade | Made In India
To Shiva's tandava, there is no match. He is Nataraja, the lord (raja) of the very form of dance (nata). His tandava has the power to destroy the universe, and ready it for creation and preservation again. The beauty of His tandava inspires numerous painters and sculptors in the subcontinent, and this is a fine example of that inspiration. Fashioned from brass and given a range of finishes to suit your space, this dancing Shiva would be a valuable addition to the territory of any Shiva devotee. Sculpted after the lissome musculature of a true yogi, this lifelike portrayal of Rudratandava with a leg raised above the head is a rare piece of iconography. His graceful hands, the anterior ones, are in the usual abhaya-and-aashirvaad stance of the more popular Nataraja; while the posterior hands bear a damru that resonates with the creative naad (Sanskrit for 'sound'), and a flame that destroys all that is created. In this light, this murti is a picture of the cycle of dynamic existence.

The rest of His iconography is replete with the usual details that set the Indian iconography apart from the rest of the world. Shiva performs the Rudratandava upon the skilfully engraved base of an inverted lotus. He is dressed in a short dhoti that sits snugly around the thigh, a richly embroidered sash from which emerges down to the pedestal. This single garment is held in place by an ornate taselled kamarband that He wears right below the navel. The janeu cascades diagonially down His handsome torso, while a clutch of necklaces spread about His neck and shoulders. The multiple bracelets on each of His arms and the anklets on His dancing feet complete His divine shringar. The most striking aspect of this composition is the awe-inspiring composure of countenance - superbly graceful features are complemented by the symmetry of the face and the large kundala-adorned ears. The magnificent, slender crown that towers atop His brow sets off the roundness of the same.

21" Harihara, An Example Of Eclectic Indian Iconography In Brass | Handmade | Made In India
  • Black With Natural Brass
  • Indian Cocoa
  • Bronze Hue
  • Patina Gold
  • Antique Green Gold
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21" Harihara, An Example Of Eclectic Indian Iconography In Brass | Handmade | Made In India
Harihara is a lesser-known deity from the Hindu pantheon. He emerges from the amalgamation of Vishnu and Shiva, the preserver and destroyer of the trinity right after Brahma the creator. The sublime serenity of Vishnu meets the fierce stance of Shiva in this composite deity. A number of defining contrasts characterise this composition. Shiva's jaatmukuta to Vishnu's golden crown; Shiva's flayed tresses to Vishnu's neatly arranged locks; Shiva's loincloth to Vishnu's shoti graciously descending down the legnth of His leg. The anterior arms belong to Shiva, one of which is raised in blessing and the other carries a mace. The posterior arms belong to Vishnu, in which He carries a conch and a lotus. Note the sharply defined countenance of Harihara: the flawless curve of the brow on which sits an elaborate tilak, the superbly symmetrical eyes, and the beauteous nose and mouth. This statue has been sculpted with great care and position on an inverted lotus, which in turn is placed on a layered platform.

Also known as Haryardhamurti, the origins of this deity have been propounded in the Vamanapurana. When the devas gathered before Vishnu in their search for Shiva, Vishnu had revealed this form to them. Harihara could have also been formed to vanquish the arrogant demon Guhasura whom Brahma had given a boon. The boon in question stated that neither Hari (Vishnu) nor Hara (Shiva) would be able to kill him. Harihara is the deity to have overpowered and slayed Him; the place where this happened in Chitradurga, Karnataka, is now named after this deity and houses a lovely Shankaranarayana temple (Shankara is another name for Shiva; Narayana, for Vishnu). The iconography in question could be traced to centuries ago, specifically to the Kusana period of Indian history.

16" The Buddha In Bhumisparsha Mudra, At The Juncture Of Enlightenment In Brass | Handmade | Made In India
  • Amazing Patina
  • Green Chola
  • Antique Green
  • Red Chola
  • Super Antique
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16" The Buddha In Bhumisparsha Mudra, At The Juncture Of Enlightenment In Brass | Handmade | Made In India
The bhumisparsha mudra is an interesting gesture assumed by no other deity than the Buddha. In Sanskrit, 'bhumi' means earth and 'sparsha' means to touch. The Buddha sits in the gracious shade of the Bodhi tree, His long limbs folded in the perfect padmasana. He is steeped in meditation as could be deduced from his composure of countenance, sculpted flawlessly from brass given multiple finishes. The piece of cloth that enrobes Him is a simple bordered garment, whose style is consummate with the finish of the sculpture. One hand rests on His lap in dhaya mudra; the other gently touches the ground that runs beneath His asana (seat) in the famous bhumisparsha mudra.


13" The Serenity Of Vajrasattva, The Adi-Buddha In Brass | Handmade | Made In India
The signature element of Vajrasattva's iconography is the pristine silvery skin. It represents this tantric deity's essential qualities of purity and newness, and the ability of the mind to transcend the space-time continuum. In this light Vajrasattva is called the Adi-Buddha, the primordial Buddha, a diamond being ('vajra' means 'diamond', 'sattva' means 'being'). He is a picturesque semblance of the spiritual faculties innate in each of us, the beginningless purity of one's nature that is unsullied by any thought or word or deed quantifiable within that continuum of human perception.


16" Shakyamuni Buddha, Ashtamangalas On His Lifelike Drape In Brass | Handmade | Made In India
  • Chola
  • Brown Gold
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16" Shakyamuni Buddha, Ashtamangalas On His Lifelike Drape In Brass | Handmade | Made In India
The Buddha is radiant. His skin is flawless, His form cast in the best proportions of man. In Sanskrit, 'buddha' means a higher-order awakening, an awakening to the primordial realities of compassion and self-existent wisdom. Each of the finishes this statue comes in brings out the enlightened beauty of His being in full measure. Indeed, this handpicked Buddha is not a mere object of worship: it is a mirror of the innermost layer of your being. Pick a variation suited to your space and temperament, and let this be the icon of your journey from ignorance to illumination.

At the juncture of awakening, when the former prince of a North Indian warring clan transitioned from the hungering acetic to the Buddha Himself, He touched (sparsha) a finger to the earth (bhumi), invoking it as His witness. The sootras narrate how the grahas (planets) came to a standstill and the entirety of jivas (living creatures) made their obeisance to Him. Despite being beyond the scope of art and literature, the superb brasswork captures the glamour of Shakyamuni's unsurpassed awakening. "Do not look to me," Shakyamuni had said, "but to the enlightenment state."


30" Vishnu, The Tejasvi In Brass | Handmade | Made In India
  • Brown Silver Gold
  • Natural Brass
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30" Vishnu, The Tejasvi In Brass | Handmade | Made In India

Hinduism is a very complex dharma, and Vishnu its most complex deity. Part of the holy trinity comprising of Brahma (creator), Vishnu (preserver), and Shiva (destroyer), to Vaishnavas He is the overlord while Brahma and Shiva merely do His bidding. His form is boundless, character non-specific, influence wide-ranging. His slender crown looms atop His head, at the back of which glows an engaved angular halo.


14" Divinity Of Nataraja's Tandava In Brass | Handmade | Made In India
  • Amazing Black Gold
  • Black Gold
  • Antique Brown Silver Gold
  • Black Green
  • Double Chola
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14" Divinity Of Nataraja's Tandava In Brass | Handmade | Made In India

The first impression gleaned from a cursory glance at the Nataraja is one of dynamic energy. In stark contrast to the Mahayogin image of Shiva wherein His divine energies are seemingly drawn inward, Nataraja exudes His force in all eight directions. His presence pervades all spaces, across all quanta of time. His limbs are in natyasthana: the right foot crushes the pulverises the apasmara that is the very picture of tamas, while the left foot is raised mid-air to the right of His torso.