Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Shipping on All Items are Expected in 2-3 Weeks on account of the Coronavirus Pandemic
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Art and Architecture > List of Architectural and Archaeologial Remains in Coorg (An Old Book)
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
List of Architectural and Archaeologial Remains in Coorg (An Old Book)
Pages from the book
List of Architectural and Archaeologial Remains in Coorg (An Old Book)
Look Inside the Book
Description
Preface

On the 11th November 1891,I received a reference from the Governme , of Madras on a letter from the Government of India directing that an examination of the archaeology and epigraphy of Coorg should be made, with a view to the preparation of lists of monuments worthy of being conserved. These lists of monuments worthy of being conserved. These lists were submitted to that Government.

The Government of India has laid down the principle that such lists must generally pass through three stages before they reach completion: “(a) The first is the preparation of an initial list of all ancient remains or buildings of presumably archaeological interest in each district or province by district officials and officers of the Archaeological Department, or such other agency as the provincial authorities may determine. The list may possibly be incomplete when first drawn up, but additions may be made to it at any time. It would form the basis on which archaeological officers would arrange their plans of survey.

(b) The second is the revision of the initial list by officials of the Archaeological Department, whose duty it is to advise and suggest which of the objects are of sufficient archaeological interest to be worthy of repairs or conservation. It may or may not be necessary that a local examination of the buildings should at this stage be made by the archaeological officials. (c) The third is the final selection under the orders of the local Government, of those buildings or remains which they may determine to be worthy of being repaired or conserved.”

With reference to Coorg, I pointed out that, prior to such an examination, and, with the view of making any tour as comprehensive as possible, rough lists of all antiquities should first be prepared by the taluk officials. On this, a tour could be arranged. As the architectural or archaeological value of a building or other ancient monument is but faintly appreciated by most of those who were to prepare these list; and thus to prevent unnecessary labour in the preparation of detailed statements or opinions likely to be of little value, it was suggested that only the name, position and kind of monument should given. The presence of inscriptions or stone-carving would help to indicate monuments likely to be of value. On these lines, lists were prepared by the village officials, and are now herein embodied.

They cannot therefore be considered in any way complete or even accurate, and are simply preliminary to final lists, such as can only be made after an inspection by those competent to decide on the value of any monument. Even such as they are, it is at places evident that full information has not been given. Thus, inscriptions are mentioned as being near “a temple “would never have been made. Again Mr. Rice mentions there are altogether 863 temple would never enumerate about 195. The importance of a temple is judged , not by its age or architecture, but by its reputed sanctity. A deserted temple is considered of no value. Again some remains mentioned in the Gazettecr, have been overlooked by those preparing these more recent lists. The taluks, nads and villages are given alphabetically; and the distances of places marked on the ordnance map in straight lines. The various classes of remains which exist in Coorg are described in the Gazettecr (pp.297-306) and may be briefly referred to.

Pre-historic sepulchral remains are numerous. Their structure and contents are similar to others found over widely distributed tracts of Southern India. Their names also are similar; they are known as Pandu-pare, pare Kallu, Pandava parekallu (stones of the Pandavas, evidently dolmens or stone circles0 and Pandavaramane (houses of the Pandavas, seemingly kistvaens). Sometimes the kistvaens are divided into two chambers and are situated singly or in groups. The relics usually found are peculiarly shaped pottery, containing earth, bones, iron spears and beads. Carved and inscribed stones.-These are of several kinds, of which the following are the principal:- (1) Kolle kallu or virakallu are the tombs of warriors slain in battle. The lists would show them to be most numerous near the Kadangas or ancient earthen fortifications. They are large slabs of granite with the front side divided into three sculptured compartments, as are those so numerously found in certain parts of the Huvinahadgalli taluk of the Bellary District. The lowest compartment represents the battle; the middle one shows the deceased being conveyed to heaven; and in the upper one, he is seated before a linga or other emblem. Similar, but more coarsely sculptured stones are erected in the north of Coorg at the present day.

(2) Masatikallu.- Stones erected to the memory of women who have committed sati.

(3) Nagakallu, inscribed stones-usually at the foot of trees, for serpent worship.

(4) Sasanakallu, inscribed stones.- Some are cut on large detached slabs of granite, others on the walls of temples. Among those in the present lists are some described as being in a language or character unknown to the village officials. Presumably these inscriptions are of ancient date.

Contents

KIGGATNAD TALUK 2-13
ANCHIKERI NAD 2
BETTIYAT NAD 2
HATGAT NAD 2
TAVALAKERINADUMUR NAD 3
MERCARA TALUK 3-14
HORUR HALERI NAD 3
HORURNUROKKAL NAD 4
MERCARA NAD 4
ULUGULI MUDIKERI NAD 4
NANJARAJAPATTANA TALUK 5-14
GADA NAD 5
NANJARAJAPATTANA HOBLI 5
RAMASVAMI KANAVE HOBLI 7
SURLABBIMUTTU NAD 7
YADAVA NAD 7
PADINALKNAD TALUK 8-14
KUYANGERI NAD 8
PADINALK NAD 9
TAVU NAD 9
YEDENALKNAD TALUK 9-14
BEPPU NAD 9
YEDENALK NAD 9
YELUSA VIRASHIME TALUK 10-14
BILHA HOBLI 10
KODLI HOBLI 10
NIDUTARA HOBLI 10


Sample Pages





List of Architectural and Archaeologial Remains in Coorg (An Old Book)

Item Code:
NAP315
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
1995
Language:
English
Size:
11.0 inch X 8.5 inch
Pages:
15
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 290 gms
Price:
$21.00   Shipping Free
Shipping expected in 2 to 3 weeks
Look Inside the Book
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
List of Architectural and Archaeologial Remains in Coorg (An Old Book)

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 450 times since 4th Dec, 2018
Preface

On the 11th November 1891,I received a reference from the Governme , of Madras on a letter from the Government of India directing that an examination of the archaeology and epigraphy of Coorg should be made, with a view to the preparation of lists of monuments worthy of being conserved. These lists of monuments worthy of being conserved. These lists were submitted to that Government.

The Government of India has laid down the principle that such lists must generally pass through three stages before they reach completion: “(a) The first is the preparation of an initial list of all ancient remains or buildings of presumably archaeological interest in each district or province by district officials and officers of the Archaeological Department, or such other agency as the provincial authorities may determine. The list may possibly be incomplete when first drawn up, but additions may be made to it at any time. It would form the basis on which archaeological officers would arrange their plans of survey.

(b) The second is the revision of the initial list by officials of the Archaeological Department, whose duty it is to advise and suggest which of the objects are of sufficient archaeological interest to be worthy of repairs or conservation. It may or may not be necessary that a local examination of the buildings should at this stage be made by the archaeological officials. (c) The third is the final selection under the orders of the local Government, of those buildings or remains which they may determine to be worthy of being repaired or conserved.”

With reference to Coorg, I pointed out that, prior to such an examination, and, with the view of making any tour as comprehensive as possible, rough lists of all antiquities should first be prepared by the taluk officials. On this, a tour could be arranged. As the architectural or archaeological value of a building or other ancient monument is but faintly appreciated by most of those who were to prepare these list; and thus to prevent unnecessary labour in the preparation of detailed statements or opinions likely to be of little value, it was suggested that only the name, position and kind of monument should given. The presence of inscriptions or stone-carving would help to indicate monuments likely to be of value. On these lines, lists were prepared by the village officials, and are now herein embodied.

They cannot therefore be considered in any way complete or even accurate, and are simply preliminary to final lists, such as can only be made after an inspection by those competent to decide on the value of any monument. Even such as they are, it is at places evident that full information has not been given. Thus, inscriptions are mentioned as being near “a temple “would never have been made. Again Mr. Rice mentions there are altogether 863 temple would never enumerate about 195. The importance of a temple is judged , not by its age or architecture, but by its reputed sanctity. A deserted temple is considered of no value. Again some remains mentioned in the Gazettecr, have been overlooked by those preparing these more recent lists. The taluks, nads and villages are given alphabetically; and the distances of places marked on the ordnance map in straight lines. The various classes of remains which exist in Coorg are described in the Gazettecr (pp.297-306) and may be briefly referred to.

Pre-historic sepulchral remains are numerous. Their structure and contents are similar to others found over widely distributed tracts of Southern India. Their names also are similar; they are known as Pandu-pare, pare Kallu, Pandava parekallu (stones of the Pandavas, evidently dolmens or stone circles0 and Pandavaramane (houses of the Pandavas, seemingly kistvaens). Sometimes the kistvaens are divided into two chambers and are situated singly or in groups. The relics usually found are peculiarly shaped pottery, containing earth, bones, iron spears and beads. Carved and inscribed stones.-These are of several kinds, of which the following are the principal:- (1) Kolle kallu or virakallu are the tombs of warriors slain in battle. The lists would show them to be most numerous near the Kadangas or ancient earthen fortifications. They are large slabs of granite with the front side divided into three sculptured compartments, as are those so numerously found in certain parts of the Huvinahadgalli taluk of the Bellary District. The lowest compartment represents the battle; the middle one shows the deceased being conveyed to heaven; and in the upper one, he is seated before a linga or other emblem. Similar, but more coarsely sculptured stones are erected in the north of Coorg at the present day.

(2) Masatikallu.- Stones erected to the memory of women who have committed sati.

(3) Nagakallu, inscribed stones-usually at the foot of trees, for serpent worship.

(4) Sasanakallu, inscribed stones.- Some are cut on large detached slabs of granite, others on the walls of temples. Among those in the present lists are some described as being in a language or character unknown to the village officials. Presumably these inscriptions are of ancient date.

Contents

KIGGATNAD TALUK 2-13
ANCHIKERI NAD 2
BETTIYAT NAD 2
HATGAT NAD 2
TAVALAKERINADUMUR NAD 3
MERCARA TALUK 3-14
HORUR HALERI NAD 3
HORURNUROKKAL NAD 4
MERCARA NAD 4
ULUGULI MUDIKERI NAD 4
NANJARAJAPATTANA TALUK 5-14
GADA NAD 5
NANJARAJAPATTANA HOBLI 5
RAMASVAMI KANAVE HOBLI 7
SURLABBIMUTTU NAD 7
YADAVA NAD 7
PADINALKNAD TALUK 8-14
KUYANGERI NAD 8
PADINALK NAD 9
TAVU NAD 9
YEDENALKNAD TALUK 9-14
BEPPU NAD 9
YEDENALK NAD 9
YELUSA VIRASHIME TALUK 10-14
BILHA HOBLI 10
KODLI HOBLI 10
NIDUTARA HOBLI 10


Sample Pages





Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to List of Architectural and Archaeologial Remains in Coorg (An Old Book) (Art and Architecture | Books)

Sons of Siva (A Study in The Religious Cults of Ganesa and Karttikeya)
by V.R.Mani
Hardcover (Edition: 1990)
Sharada Publishing House
Item Code: NAE885
$27.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
I have received my parcel from postman. Very good service. So, Once again heartfully thank you so much to Exotic India.
Parag, India
My previous purchasing order has safely arrived. I'm impressed. My trust and confidence in your business still firmly, highly maintained. I've now become your regular customer, and looking forward to ordering some more in the near future.
Chamras, Thailand
Excellent website with vast variety of goods to view and purchase, especially Books and Idols of Hindu Deities are amongst my favourite. Have purchased many items over the years from you with great expectation and pleasure and received them promptly as advertised. A Great admirer of goods on sale on your website, will definately return to purchase further items in future. Thank you Exotic India.
Ani, UK
Thank you for such wonderful books on the Divine.
Stevie, USA
I have bought several exquisite sculptures from Exotic India, and I have never been disappointed. I am looking forward to adding this unusual cobra to my collection.
Janice, USA
My statues arrived today ….they are beautiful. Time has stopped in my home since I have unwrapped them!! I look forward to continuing our relationship and adding more beauty and divinity to my home.
Joseph, USA
I recently received a book I ordered from you that I could not find anywhere else. Thank you very much for being such a great resource and for your remarkably fast shipping/delivery.
Prof. Adam, USA
Thank you for your expertise in shipping as none of my Buddhas have been damaged and they are beautiful.
Roberta, Australia
Very organized & easy to find a product website! I have bought item here in the past & am very satisfied! Thank you!
Suzanne, USA
This is a very nicely-done website and shopping for my 'Ashtavakra Gita' (a Bangla one, no less) was easy. Thanks!
Shurjendu, USA
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2020 © Exotic India