Buy Celestial Sculptures of Asparas from South India Only at Exotic India

33 inch Height X 13 inch Width X 20 inch Depth
$3730
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12.5 inch Height X 4.5 inch Width X 3 inch Depth
$385
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16 inch Height X 5 inch Width X 6 inch Depth
$725
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14 inch Height X 4 inch Width X 5 inch Depth
$530
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36 inch Height x 14.7 inch Width x 3.7 inch Depth
$750
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Apsara (A Sculpture Inspired by Khajuraho)
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36 inch Height x 14.5 inch Width x 5.5 inch Depth
$1075
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36.00 inch Height X 17.70 inch Width x 4.70 inch Depth
$895
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36.00 inch Height X 17.50 inch Width x 4.50 inch Depth
$895
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18.20 inch Height X 9.50 inch Width x 4.00 inch Depth
$325
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35.00 inch Height X 17.50 inch Width x 4.70 inch Depth
$895
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The Drummer (Apsara)
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25 inch x 11.5 inch 4.5 inch
$595
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Heavenly Apsaras Musical Panel
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12.5 inch Height x 35.5 inch Width X 2.5 inch Depth
$600
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Large Size Lady with Mirror (Apsara)
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34 inch x 14 inch x 6 inch
$955
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The Apsara Applying Vermillion (A Statue Inspired by Khajuraho)
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35.7 inch Height x 14.5 inch Width X 3.5 inch Depth
$955
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Large Size Lady with Mirror (Apsara)
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36.0 inch x 19.0 inch x 7.0 inch
$1450
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Love-longing Apsara
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15 inch x 8.8 inch x 2.7 inch
$330
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Large Size Love-longing Apsara
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35 inch x 21.5 inch x 6.5 inch
$1320
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Musician Lady-Apsara
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24.5 inch x 11.5 inch x 5 inch
$530
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The Apsara Applying Vermillion (A Statue Inspired by Khajuraho)
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36.5 inch X 16.5 inch X 5.5 inch
$1190
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Celestial Apsara with Her Swan
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37.5 inch x 18 inch x 6.8 inch
$1190
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The Dancer Apsara
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25 inch X 10.5 inch x 5 inch
$530
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Large Size Love-longing Apsara
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36 inch X 18 inch X 7 inch
$1680
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The Musician Apsara (अप्सरा)
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25 inch X 11.5 inch X 4 inch
$670
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Apsara
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36 inch X 14.5 inch X 3.5 inch
$840
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Dancing Apsara
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24.5 inch X 8.0 inch X 5.0 inch
$540
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Apsara with Veena
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36.0" X 12.0" X 5.0"
$1430
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Sensuous Image of an Apsara
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3.0 ft X 1.3 ft X 0.3 ft
$1115
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Apsara
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3.0 ft X 1.5 ft X 0.4 ft
$780
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Dancing Apsara
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3.5 ft X 1.3 ft X 0.5 ft
$1835
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Apsara with Spread Legs
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3.2 ft X 1.3 ft X 0.5 ft
$1740
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Apsara with Sitar
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3.5 X 1.3 X 0.5 ft
$1210
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Love-longing Apsara
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3.2 ft x 1.7 ft x 0.6 ft
$1980
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Celestial Nymphs - Apsaras
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1 ft x 3 ft
$850
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Embrace the blessing showered by The beauties who inhabit Lord Indra’s court, the magnificent Apsaras

Apsaras are a form of female spirits of the mists and waters in Hindu and Buddhist culture. They figure noticeably in the statues, dance, writing, and painting of numerous South Asian and Southeast Asian societies. There are two kinds of apsaras: laukika and daivika. In Indian folklore, apsaras are excellent, extraordinary female creatures. They are young and exquisite and great in the craft of dancing. They are most of the time wives of the Gandharvas, Lord Indra's court musicians. They dance to the music made by the Gandharvas, typically in the castles of the divine beings, engage and some of the time tempt divine beings and men. As ethereal creatures who live in the skies, they are often mistaken as heavenly messengers, the angels. 

Apsaras are supposed to have the option to change their shape voluntarily and rule over the fortunes of gaming and gambling. Apsaras are now and again contrasted with the Muses of old Greece, with every one of the 26 Apsaras at Indra's court addressing an unmistakable part of the performing arts. They are related to fertility customs.



The Bhagavata Purana additionally expresses that the apsaras were brought into the world from Kashyapa and Muni. In the antiquated Manipur culture of the Meitei nation of northeastern India, apsaras are considered heavenly sprites or hellois as the flying female creatures drawing in the male vagabonds or any knights who lost their routes in the forest. They were known for their magnificence, style, otherworldly powers, and captivating extraordinary Androphilic Magnetism. They are accepted to be seven in number and are the little daughters of the sky god or the Soraren god. The most well-known Apsaras in Indian fables are Rambha, Menaka, Urvashi, Tilottama, and Ghritachi. The Puranas additionally talk about other minor sprites like Mishrakesi, Vapu, Viprachitti, Purvachitti, Sahajanya, Karnika, Punjikasthala, Viswachi, Rithisthala, Umlocha, Pramlocha, Swayamprabha, Janapadi, and Adrika. The chief Apsaras are accepted to have emerged from the Ocean of Milk, during the Samudra Manthana episode, wherein the ocean was stirred by the Devas and the Daityas (Asuras or Demons).



FAQs


Q1. Who is the prettiest Apsara?


Urvashi, a divine apsara is viewed as the prettiest of all the apsaras and one of the most prolific dancers in the heavenly realm. Urvashi is referenced in numerous Vedic and Puranic sacred writings of Hinduism. Urvashi's introduction to the world is described in the Devi-Bhagavata Purana. In the legend, the siblings Nara and Narayana are performing retribution to satisfy Lord Brahma, yet this makes Indra (the lord of the devas) shaky about his privileged position and he doesn't believe that the sage should secure heavenly powers. Subsequently, he makes various deceptions to break their meditation, yet each of his stunts falls flat. At long last, he arranges the apsaras of his court, including Rambha, Menaka, and Tilottama, to go to Nara-Narayana and break their meditation through temptation. Joined by God Kama and desire goddess Rati, the apsaras go to Nara-Narayana and begin to move alluringly before them. Be that as it may, the sages stay unaffected by this and choose to break the pride of the apsaras. Narayana slaps his thigh, from which Urvashi arises. Her excellence leaves Indra's apsaras incomparable and they become embarrassed about their malevolent demonstration. Nara and Narayana guarantee Indra that they wouldn't take his high position and gift Urvashi to him. 


Q2. Who is the queen of apsaras?


Rambha in Hindu folklore is the Queen of the Apsaras, the mystical and lovely female of Devaloka. She is unmatched in her achievements in artistic expressions of dancing, music, and magnificent beauty.