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Showing 1 to 12 of 12 results
Showing 1 to 12 of 12 results
Indian Sari
A quintessential item of Indian fashion is undoubtedly the Sari. In fact, when considering Indian style, the first thing that many often think of is the sari. The word “sari” itself comes from the Sanskrit word “sati”, which means strip of cloth. From the very meaning of the word, the Indian sari, which can also be spelled as “saree”, is one long piece of cloth, which is unstitched and usually measures between four and a half to nine yards long and twenty-four to forty-seven inches wide. Now, a sari is not just any simple piece of cloth. Saris come in a wide range of eye-catching colors, and striking designs that often feature various prints, embroideries and embellishments, and are made of different fabrics. There are said to be approximately thirty different regional varieties of Saris in India. The nation’s well-known tradition and expertise in dyeing, printing and silk weaving fabrics all come alive in the countless saris worn by women in India and beyond the country’s shores.
Published in Sep 2021
Green Tara: The mother of liberation
Buddhism is full of unique religious expressions, in which faith combines with culture to shape all those beliefs that make up this ancient religion. Within Buddhism there are many deities with special characteristics that are worthy of veneration by believers; whether they are from Hinduism or other beliefs, these deities are important and the rituals to worship them are always present. That is why deities such as Tara, a goddess with many forms in which the green Tara stands out, is important to Buddhists, as this divine mother has qualities such as helping you achieve success and get ahead.
Published in Sep 2021
10 Ways to Style Indian Stone Jewelry
Indian stone jewelry is beautifully decorated and available in various stone and precious metal types. Sterling silver, amethyst, and citrine stone jewelry are a few of many gems seen adorning the runways of Indian Fashion Week 2021. From chandelier earrings to choker style necklaces, adding bold indian accessories isn’t a challenge. Keep reading to learn how you can achieve high fashion looks by creating casual and evening outfits with indian stone jewelry! Add a collar necklace with an embroidered skirt and dupatta A collar-style necklace is the perfect way to accentuate your neckline. This look also allows you to skip earrings and bracelet accessories, since the intricate detailing of your necklace will become the focal point. You can add a full skirt with a ruffle hem and an all-over embroidered design. This indian stone accessory works best with lighter, neutral colors against darker colors, like white and blue. You can wear your hair in a sweet half up, half down hairstyle and light makeup. For a royal touch, add a matching, sheer dupatta scarf!
Published in Sep 2021
Banarasi Sari
Not all saris are created equal. In the world of Indian saris, the Banarasi Sari is in a class of its own. In fact, a few years ago, the Banarasi Sari was granted Geographical Indication rights, which distinguishes a product as originating from a particular region, where superior quality, excellence, renown, and distinct characteristics are associated with that specific location. This means that, much like Champagne must come from the Champagne region of France in order for it to be actually called Champagne, a sari must meet certain characteristics and be produced within the six districts of Uttar Pradesh in order for it to be rightfully called a Banarasi Sari. So, what makes the Banarasi Sari so special? First, it’s important to understand its history. Banarasi Saris originate from the city of Varanasi, also known as Banaras, which is, naturally, within the region of Uttar Pradesh, India. It was during the Mughal period in the 14th century when the art of intricate weaving began to flourish in the city. During those times, the exquisite silk of the Banarasi Sari was exclusively crafted for royalty and was woven using genuine gold and silver threads. It could often take as long as one year in order to handcraft these silks. Suffice it to say, when it came to garments, the Banarasi Sari represented the pinnacle of quality craftsmanship, luxury, and extravagance.
Published in Sep 2021
How To Style A Dupatta Scarf In The Modern Age
The dupatta scarf is one of the most highly decorated scarf types made of delicate materials and luxurious detailing. The length alone makes it breathable for movement, while allowing for easy pinning to create different looks. It’s more than just a square cloth, with both devout and sentimental meaning. In this article, we dive into the symbolism, design and styling of this diverse cut of fabric! A brief history of the dupatta scarf A dupatta is a traditional headscarf (usually worn over the shoulders), within Asian cultures including Indian, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Dupatta is a combination of two Sanskrit words which means two or double (du) and (patta), which means piece of clothing. The earliest remembrance can be dated back to Indus Valley civilization, when they were worn by both men and women. Males mostly wore their scarves to symbolize royalty and were mainly used to cover the upper body area. Over time, the dupatta scarf was geared more towards the seclusion of women within the social hierarchy. Majority of women not only covered their upper with a scarf, they rarely showcased bare legs. The delicate fabric has also been used as a way to show respect for elders within families, while keeping the look of modesty.
Published in Sep 2021
Mehendi
No one does body art like in India, where the craft has existed for thousands of years. Mehendi or Mehndi, as it’s also known, is the ancient form of temporary body art or skin decoration. In fact, the tradition goes so far back that archeologists have found mummies with forms of Mehendi on their hands. You could say that it’s the early ancestor of today’s common tattoo but one that isn’t permanent. In Western cultures, the temporary skin art is widely known as the henna tattoo. Unlike permanent tattoo ink, Mehendi is applied on the skin using a paste that’s derived from the crushed dried leaves of the henna plant. Hence its western name. A paintbrush, gold rod, plastic cone, toothpick or stick are the usual tools used to apply the paste onto the skin. While the color of the paste is usually a dark brown, it can also vary in shade with Mehendi sometimes applied in red color tones.
Published in Sep 2021
Temple Jewelry
As the saying goes, all that glitters is not gold. However, in India, well, it often is. A magnificent part of Indian culture is traditional Indian jewelry. Imagine intricately formed, ornate gold adorned with the most stunningly brilliant gemstones, pearls and diamonds. There are actually three major classifications of traditional Indian jewelry. There’s bridal jewelry, spiritual jewelry and, last but not least, temple jewelry. The origins of temple jewelry can be traced back to South India in particular. From the ninth century until the sixteenth century, the region of South India was ruled by the Chola, Pandya and Krishnadeva Raya dynasties, who were all fine jewelry connoisseurs. Ruling for such a long period of time, temple jewelry became an intrinsic part of both religious and cultural tradition.
Published in Sep 2021
Meet Jhumka – The History of Indian Earrings
If you’ve ever attended a wedding or special occasion, then the chances are that you saw dozens of women wearing jhumka. They’re a style of earrings popular on the Indian subcontinent and hold a cultural significance, dating back to the Mughal Empire. Jewelry is the ultimate form of self-expression and an opportunity to reconnect with your heritage through a form of living art. You can find jhumka earrings in almost every shape and style, each incorporating the signature bell shape into the design. No woman’s jewelry box is complete without a pair of jhumka earrings. These timeless earrings double as an ornament, giving you a statement piece that is sure to be the center of attention wherever you go.
Published in Sep 2021
The Heritage and Evolution of Pattachitra Paintings
Paintings are one of the oldest forms of storytelling in the world. Pattachitra art is one of the oldest forms of art from Pattachitra – giving the artform its name. This art style was used to depict images of Hindu mythological stories and fascinating characters. You can spot Pattachitra art with its distinctive bold colors and Italian craftsmanship. If you want to add a unique piece of Indian art to your home, there is nothing better to choose than a Pattachitra painting. These paintings incorporate Indian customs, rituals, and values in a unique and beautiful way that celebrates the Hindu faith and religion. This traditional art has evolved to appear in clothing and accessories, becoming living art that you can incorporate into your everyday life.
Published in Sep 2021
The History of Pashmina Shawls
Is there anything more beautiful than a pashmina shawl? No two styles are the same, with a spectrum of colors and infinite designs to choose from. Pashmina shawls take their name from Pashmina goats that reside high in the mountains of Nepal and across India and Tibet. The word ‘pashmina’ comes from ‘pashm’, meaning ‘inner layer of hair’. These scarves add a sense of luxury to your everyday life. While one human hair is 75 microns thick, normal cashmere is typically 20 microns. What makes pashmina cashmere so luxurious is that it is 12 microns thick, meaning it is 6 times finer than the typical human hair. It takes around three goats to produce enough hair for a pashmina shawl.
Published in Sep 2021
10 Must-Have Traditional Handmade Bedspreads from India
Ethnic traditional bedspreads from India are full of vibrant colors! This makes it easy to add a touch of culture to your room decor. Traditional Indian quilting dates back as early as the 17th century, when the technique was used to make clothing such as hunting coats. Usually made from chintz fabric, which was dyed and painted cotton, each was made with running stitches. Originally made to carry babies, kantha quilts specifically are a popular Indian style bedspread. Made from cotton or silk, they adorn patterns of flowers and birds. They have a soft feel due to the intention of creating each quilt from cotton saris. Lep Kanthas, a different type of quilt, are made of 7 layers and usually have geometric designs and patterns. There's also Sujni quilts that are mostly used for guests. Between vibrant colors and intricate prints, these homemade bedspreads from India will satisfy your eclectic home decor needs.
Published in Sep 2021
A Journey Into Handloom weaving
This article is for handloom users keen to understand more about the process and those interested in exploring handlooms for the first time. We would like to acquaint you with the different stages in the process, where individual fibres come together to become beautiful fabrics and how you can distinguish pure handloom from imitations. Knowing handlooms also allows you to understand the challenges industry is facing in current times. This journey into the handloom world, we hope, will enable you to better enjoy and appreciate these fabrics. 1. In Cotton Cotton was traditionally the single largest natural fibre used in clothing. Today India occupies the second position in cotton production in the world. Many varieties of cotton were produced in our country, the majority being the short staple variety which is ideal for hand spinning. We have moved away from growing short staple varieties but still produce good amounts of cotton both for domestic use and for export. Heavy use of pesticide has led to many problems and now there is a shift to organic farming Over 500 indigenous varieties of cotton were grown in India in the past. Today, we grow less than 20 varieties
Published in Aug 2021
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