Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Blue-Ribbon Brocaded Lehenga in Multicolor Thread Weaving with Embroidered Choli and Pink Dupatta

Blue-Ribbon Brocaded Lehenga in Multicolor Thread Weaving with Embroidered Choli and Pink Dupatta

For those of us who are not used to the complex drape of the saree, the lehenga is a fine substitute. It has all the traditional opulence of, say, a Banarasi or a Baluchari silk, and has been great favourite with modern brides who want to achieve a look that is exotic and regal. The lehenga comprises of three pieces - a long loosely flowing skirt, a choli, and an ample odhni. The ensemble you see on this page is replete with all three fashioned from pure homegrown silk. It is the skirt that adds the most personality to a lehenga ensemble, and the one you see on this page would make you the subject of conversations everywhere.

The ample pleats alone would make this a statement addition to your wardrobe or even trousseau. Ample brocade-work graces its gorgeous length, filled in with a definitive variety of motifs - gold tendrils with paisleys against the dark blue of the foundation, an infusion of petals in gorgeous bridal pinks and oranges, and panels of lilies and lotuses in matching colours all the way down to the hem. The choli has similar gold motifs in matching dark blue. The signature pink dupatta complements the base colour of the lehenga. It is so long it reaches the hem of the skirt, while the translucent silk it is made from is dyed a colour no woman or bride could go wrong with.

Post a comment +
Post
Enthroned Bhagavti, Accompanied By Her Handmaidens (Tantric Devi Series)

Enthroned Bhagavti, Accompanied By Her Handmaidens (Tantric Devi Series)

Bhagavati rules the Tantric heavenly realms. Framed by wisps of pale blue clouds in the background and a patch of dense green grasses in the foreground, this watercolour is a Basholi-style depiction of the Tantric Devi whose devotees never lack in wealth. She sits in lalitasana, which is highly atypical of Indian iconography, on a high-backed throne. It is richly studded with emeralds and rubies that glitter against the sun-bathed moors of the background. She leans against gorgeously coloured cushions in the sea of pastel-coloured silks that clothe Her beauteous form. Note how the garland of pristine flowers reaches all the way down to Her feet, and puts to shame the gold and jewels of the rest of Her shringar. She holds in Her hands a conch as fair and voluptuous as She is, its divine music being carried by the same winds that lift up the locks of Her waist-length hair.

The Devi is waited upon by two handmaidens who rival each other in terms of personal beauty and devotion to Her. Dressed in elegant silken skirts and seductive translucent dupattas, one of these ladies offers a namaskaram to Bhagavati while the other waves over Her head a chauri, which is an arati implement fit for royals. Their shringar does justice to the resplendent, enthroned entity painted betwixt them. Note how this composition has similarities with Mughal imperial portraiture, which serve to convey the power implicit in Her iconography and attributes.

Post a comment +
Post
Hanuman, A Jewel Amongst Yogis

Hanuman, A Jewel Amongst Yogis

Lord Hanuman stands as the finest example of human excellence. He is the greatest of Rama-devotees, having remained in this world for as long as the Ramayana is recited, even after the rest of the characters left for parloka (the subsequent realm of existence). He is the son of Anjanadevi and Vayudeva, and tutored by none other than Sooryadeva Himself. Mischievous as He was as a child (the signature jawline that lends Him His name is the result of a punishing blow dealt to Him by an angered Indra), He grew up to be a yogi of the highest order, having attained all eight of the classical ashta-siddhis of yoga. It is this roopa of His that has been depicted in this wood-cut sculpture, wherein He is seated in a poorna-padmasana with His palms brought together in the dhyana muda and the eyes shut (the gaze is directed inwards).

The beauty of Ramayan's brightest character has been captured in this sculpture with great skill. The handsome face of the Lord is framed by a semi-circular halo, the glamour of which has been conveyed with multiple tiers of engraving. Broad shoulders and muscular arms give way to a well-defined torso followed by limbs of divine strength. Pearly shringar and a dhoti of silk, the pleats of which are spread on the pedestal right beneath where He is seated, grace His form. The three-tiered pedestal is the most unusual aspect of this composition. The topmost tier is engraved with lotus petals; the middle tier has inverted lotus petals superimposed with His signature weapon, the goad; and the third tier has a flower in full bloom at the centre.

Post a comment +
Post
Shaivite Trident-Aum-Rudraksha Pendant With Silvery Gems

Shaivite Trident-Aum-Rudraksha Pendant With Silvery Gems

This Shaivite pendant is quite the thing to go into your jewellery box if you are a devotee of Shiva. Fashioned from gold and drawn into the deity's signature trishool (trident), it is studded with motifs that substitute for the very image of Shiva. A big brown rudraksha is inserted between two gold sheaves at the base of the trishool. Along the stem of the trishool is a sacred syllable carving of the aum that is studded with glittering silvery gems. Zoom in on the body of the syllable to gauge the gold make of the foundation. A damru motif has been strategically inserted into the syllable, which emits the naad (sound) of srishti (creation of existence). The strokes that complete the picture of the syllable has likewise been done in gold and studded with silver-coloured gemstones at the ends.

While this pendant may be too quirky in terms of style to be worn on an everyday basis, it is just the thing to don at devotional gatherings and conventions. We understand that devotional jewellery would hold a special place in our buyers' jewellery box, so we curate the most expressive ones to go into our collection. Not only are our pieces unique - they will start conversations everywhere - they also meet a very high aesthetic standard and are handpicked from the finest of local artisans. Wearing some of our devotional jewellery is like carrying an essence of your chosen lord around on your person.

Post a comment +
Post
Bedspread from Gujarat with Applique Elephants and Kantha Embroidery

Bedspread from Gujarat with Applique Elephants and Kantha Embroidery

Kantha is a kind of running stitch that is done by women in parts of India as a form of quilting. Today, fabric that features embroidery done using this stitch is also referred to as kantha. Such embroidered fabrics, which could be anything from sarees and cholies to bedspreads and other home decor, make for a very fashionable statement. This bedspread is a fine example of the kantha stitch. It is made from pure homegrown cotton that takes best to the densely packed stitches of this style. Contrary to the rough quilt-like finish associated with kantha, this bedspread comes with a finesse that speaks well of the artisans who made it.

Rural Gujarat is known for the quirky textiles it produces and its love for vibrant colours. Local artisans make it a habit to infuse the pastels one sees in the countryside into their fabrics, of which this bedspread is proof. The motif of the richly adorned elephant with its trunk raised has been arranged in repetitive panels across the field, which are interspersed with kantha embroidery. The elephants have been appliqued onto the base fabric, which gives away the degree of creative skill and labour that has gone into this bedspread. The dominant colour variations include black and red, from which you are welcome to choose depending on the tone you want to set your bedroom to.

Post a comment +
Post
The Banyan Tree And The Four Harmonious Brothers (Brocadeless Thangka)

The Banyan Tree And The Four Harmonious Brothers (Brocadeless Thangka)

The four harmonious brothers stand for a very basic tenet of Buddhism. Each of the four brothers, and the harmony in which they are positioned relative to each other, has great significance. It is in Buddha's Tittira Jataka parable that these brothers are first mentioned. When His eldest disciple, Shariputra, was left to spend the night under a tree while the younger disciples had selfishly secured their shelters in Vaisali, the Buddha narrated the parable of the four harmonious brothers in order to teach them the importance of seniority in terms of age. It is the story of four brothers who dwelt in the Himalayan foothills and amongst whom mutual respect had diminished. In order to establish seniority, they began to discuss the age of the banyan tree near them.

The elephant had seen it in the form of a substantial little bush when he was a baby; the monkey remembered it from his childhood as a mere shrub; the rabbit had seen the same tree as a leafless sapling; while the partridge had carried its very seed in its body and planted it there. Hence, the partridge came to be honoured most among the brothers. The way the four creatures are arranged in this thangka symbolise the harmony, stability, and mutual respect that now defines them. In the gorgeous shade of the luxuriant banyan tree the brothers stand one on top of the other according to age, while ducks and lotuses abound in the pond in the foreground and numerous verdant hills dot the landscape in the background.

Post a comment +
Post
The Magnificence Of Dakshinamurti Shiva

The Magnificence Of Dakshinamurti Shiva

Amongst the Nataraja and the tandava pieces abound, the Daskhinamurti portrayal reveals a rare side of the Lord Shiva. On one of His Himalayan wanderings, Shiva was stopped by a group of wandering ascetics and beseeched to be their guru Himself. The kind and merciful Shiva agreed, and sat upon a mountaintop facing southwards. His newfound shishyas gathered round His feet with their hands in the namaskaram mudra, expressive of the deepest veneration. Thus emerged the Dakshinamurti roopa of the Lord, as could be seen on this page. An imitation of a rugged mountain is His asana, and from behind Him emerges a shock of wild mountain greenery. He has assumed lalitasana as is characteristic of Indian iconography. The posterior hands bear the damru (which produces the creative naad) and the flame (that destroys everything in its path), which is a representation of the dharmic cycle; while the anterior hands bear a pothi and the aahsirvaad mudra to complement His teaching.

It goes without saying that the Dakshinamurti roopa of the Lord is the most magnificent and awe-inspiring. The degree of skill and labour that have gone into this particular Daskhinamurti Shiva, as well as the finish variations chosen for it to be made available in, rightly convey the grandeur of His guruship. From the natural textures of the mountain to the musculature of the Lord, each aspect of this sculpture pours forth an aesthetics that is to be found only in the art of India. The shishyas with their gleaming crowns as well as the figure of ignorance that Shiva crushes with His feet are all carved with jsut the right proportion of detail. What distinguishes this from other Dakshinamurti compositions is the gorgeous headdress that frames His compassionate countenance and complements His shringar.

Post a comment +
Post
Krishna Silhouette Pendant, Peacock-feather On His Crown

Krishna Silhouette Pendant, Peacock-feather On His Crown

This minimalistic pendant, beautifully smithed as it is, would be a statement addition to your jewellery box. If you are a devotee of Krishna and love jewellery that is unfussy, this is the number for you. It is a simple circular rim of gold, of a uniformly undulating texture. Within the rim is the image of Krishna Himself. He is the favourite of Hindus worldwide, especially young women, just like He was with the gopis at Vrindavan. He is infinitely loving, kind, and wise, and His charms are plenty. Formed in the choicest proportions of a youthful man, He makes divine music with His signature instrument, the flute. In this pendant, one could see the unmistakable silhouette of this deeply loved deity.

The face is carved from a piece of shimmering silver, topped with a hint of gold that functions as a crown. A necklace of miniscule silver stones has been smithed below the same. The rest of His form is in outline, done with select quantities of gold that indicate the sashes and shringar of His form. A stick of gold, which is what seems to be the flute, is to His right, together with a beautifully blooming silver-coloured lotus. The statement-making aspect of this pendant is the gorgeous peacock-feather smithed at an angle to Krishna's crown - a shapely carving of silver, embedded with glassy-coloured stones, dominates the handiwork.

Post a comment +
Post
Reed-Yellow Sanskrit Sari from Jharkhand

Reed-Yellow Sanskrit Sari from Jharkhand

The eastern state of Bihar is the home of tussar, an endemic silk that is at once recognisable by its earthy sheen and creamy ivory colour. Having been cultivated by various tribal groups of the region since before the colonial era, the art of working with this fabric is now a thriving cottage industry in rural India. It is from the finest tussar produce that this saree has been handpicked to go into our collection, given its eclectic concept. The Sanskrit varnamala dominates the field of this saree. The letters are done in outlined, solid-coloured, and dotted variations, which give it an appeal of the unconventional despite the saree being a traditional Indian silk and the script ancient.

Conventionally, tussar silks have been worn by upper-caste women during the ritual preparation, cooking, and eating of meals within the home. The practicality and ritual correctness of this variety of Indian sarees comes from the fact that the tussar fabric is fairly water-resistant and repels stains. The modern-day woman dons the most exquisite tussars such as this one on more glamorous pursuits outside the home. The woven border is neither too thin nor too thick. It is set off by rows of a dotted pattern, and a line of dancing silhouettes filled in with black. An interesting gradient of black and ivory characterises the endpiece, punctuated with a panel of text in the Sanskrit language. Team this saree with a set of understated gold ornaments to make the most of its singular appeal.

Post a comment +
Post
The Warrior's Lover In The Throes Of Passion

The Warrior's Lover In The Throes Of Passion

In the dead of night, she rises sleepless and inches towards his sword. She brings it back to bed with her, unable to contain herself in his absence. He is away at battle, while his lover pines from her concern for his well-being and the separation at having to let him go. The painting you see on this page is a sensuous portrayal of the lover's essay to substitute one of his swords with the warrior's presence. She presses the cold metal of the weapon against her torso and shuts her gorgeous eyes, probably like she would have responded to similar proximity with him. The gold of the ornate hilt matches the ample gold that glitter against the marble skin of her naked back.

The dynamicism of the painting comes out in the bangles on her wrists, the bejewelled streams of gold on her tresses, and the purple silk draped around her curvaceous hip that matches the makeup on those eyes. One could almost listen to the rustling of the silk and the tinkling of her shringar as she motions against the piercing edge of the sword. She is an exceptionally beautiful woman with full, expressive features, and a head of luxuriant hair as black as a tropical night. Note the background infusions of rich red colour, which serve to convey the passion that has seized the lady in the foreground.

Post a comment +
Post
«     Previous     1   2   3   4   5   6     Next     »
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Share with friends
Related Items
Goloka -Nag Champa Agarbathi (Pack 12 Packets)
Goloka -Nag Champa Agarbathi (Pack 12 Packets)
Goloka
$35.00
Goloka -Nag Champa Agarbathi (Pack 12 Packets)
Studies in Rgveda and Modern Sanskrit Literature
Studies in Rgveda and Modern Sanskrit Literature
Hardcover
S. Ranganath
$25.00
Studies in Rgveda and Modern Sanskrit Literature
Selfless Action - Compilation and Critical Analysis of The Practical Philosophy of Karma Yoga (Set of 2 Volumes)
Selfless Action - Compilation and Critical Analysis of The Practical Philosophy of Karma Yoga (Set of 2 Volumes)
Hardcover
G. Sankarasubba Ayyar
$50.00
Selfless Action - Compilation and Critical Analysis of The Practical Philosophy of Karma Yoga (Set of 2 Volumes)
Candle Stand
Candle Stand
Brass Sculpture
14.2 inch Height x 3.8 inch Width x 4 inch Depth
$135.00
Candle Stand
Peacock Hanging Bells
Peacock Hanging Bells
Brass Statue
9 inch Height x 10.5 inch Width X 10.5 inch Depth
27 inch - Chain Length
$155.00
Peacock Hanging Bells
Nandi Muzzling The Feet Of Ardhanarishvara
Nandi Muzzling The Feet Of Ardhanarishvara
Water Color Painting on Patti Paper
Folk Art From The Temple Town Puri (Orissa)
Artist: Rabi Behera
19 inches X 39.5 inches
$395.00
Nandi Muzzling The Feet Of Ardhanarishvara
Shri Krishna Lila Pata with Kaliya Mardan In Centre
Shri Krishna Lila Pata with Kaliya Mardan In Centre
Water Color Painting on Patti
Folk Art From The Temple Town Puri (Orissa)
Artist: Rabi Behra
38 inches x 22.5 inches
$395.00
Shri Krishna Lila Pata with Kaliya Mardan In Centre
Bon its Encounter With Buddhism in Tibet
Bon its Encounter With Buddhism in Tibet
Hardcover
B. L. Bansal
$28.00
Bon its Encounter With Buddhism in Tibet
Divine Wisdom - A Book on Eternal Truth of Life and Living
Divine Wisdom - A Book on Eternal Truth of Life and Living
Paperback
Swami Gyanratna
$23.00
Divine Wisdom - A Book on Eternal Truth of Life and Living
Twenty Two Wicks Peacock Puja Lamp With Bells
Twenty Two Wicks Peacock Puja Lamp With Bells
Brass Statue
15.8 inch Height x 9 inch Width x 9.8 inch Depth
$245.00
Twenty Two Wicks Peacock Puja Lamp With Bells
Show More
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2019 © Exotic India