Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > History > Sikh > Sikhism
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Sikhism
Sikhism
Description
About the Author

Annie Besant (1847-1933), second President of the Theosophical Society (1907-1933), was described as a 'Diamond Soul' for she had many brilliant facets to her character. She was an outstanding orator of her time, a champion of human freedom, educationist, philanthropist and author with more than three hundred books and pamphlets to her credit. She also guided thousands of men and women all over the world in their spiritual quest.

In her earlier days in England, she did remarkable work as a Freethinker and Fabian socialist, and supported many noble causes including women's rights. From 1893, she lived in India and worked indefatigably for the cultural and spiritual renaissance of the country. She organized the Home Rule movement and inspired Indians with a dynamic vision of India's future.

Foreword

The following lecture does not pretend to be any- thing more than a popular exposition, intended for the ordinary reader rather than for the student. Delivered to audiences composed almost entirely of Hindus, with only a sprinkling of Zoroastrians and Christians, they rather take for granted a knowledge of Sanskrit terms; so notes have been added where obscurity might arise from their use. They are intended to help members of each of the religions to recognize the value and beauty of faiths which are not their own, and demonstrate their underlying unity.

In the lecture on Buddhism I had especially in mind the misconceptions which shut the Lord Buddha out from the hearts of his countrymen, and strove to remove them by quotations from the received scriptures containing the authoritative records of his own words. For indeed I know of no greater service that could be rendered to religion than to draw together again these sundered faiths which almost divide between them the Eastern world. Mother- and daughter they are, and family feuds are proverbially bitter; yet might the quarrel be healed, if the desire for amity reigned on both sides.

Less deeply rooted, but more bitter, was the antagonism to Christianity, exasperated by the ignorant and often coarse and abusive attacks levelled by the lower class of missionaries against the venerable faith held by nearly all my hearers. Yet they listened respectfully and after a while sympathetically to the exposition of the faith so young in comparison with their own, and finally recognized that it also was a great religion, and was not really alien from Hinduism. I can wish these lectures no better fate than that they may act as a message of peace to the hearts of their readers, as they evidently did to the hearts of their hearers.

The general principles underlying these lectures are the following: Each religion is looked at in the light of occult knowledge, both as regards its history and its teachings. Without despising the conclusions arrived at by the patient and admirable work of European scholars, I have unhesitatingly cast them aside where they conflict with important facts preserved in occult history, whether in those imperishable records where all the past is still to be found in living pictures, or in ancient documents carefully stored up by Initiates and not wholly inaccessible. Especially is this the case with regard to the ages of Hinduism and Zoroastrianism, touching which modern scholarship is ludicrously astray. That scholarship, however, will regard the occult view as being, in its turn, grotesquely wrong. Be it so. Occultism can wait to be justified by discoveries, as so many of its much-ridiculed statements as to antiquity have already been. The earth is a faithful guardian, and as the archeologist uncovers the cities buried within her, many an unexpected witness will be found to justify the antiquity that is claimed.

Secondly, each religion is treated as coming from the one great Brotherhood, which is the steward and custodian of spiritual knowledge. Each is treated as an expression, by some member or messenger of that Brotherhood, of the eternal spiritual truths, an expression suited to the needs of the time at which it was made, and of the dawning civilization that it was intended to mould and to guide in its evolution. Each religion has its own mission in the world, is suited to the nations to whom it is given, and to the type of civilization it is to permeate, bringing it into line with the general evolution of the human family. The failure to see this leads to unjust criticism, for an ideally perfect religion would not be suitable to imperfect and partially evolved men, and environment must always be considered by the Wise when they plant a new slip of the ancient tree of wisdom.

Thirdly, an attempt is made to distinguish the essential from the non-essential in each religion, and to treat chiefly the former. For every religion, in the course of time, suffers from accretions due to ignorance, not to wisdom; to blindness, not to vision. Within the brief compass of a lecture, it was not possible to distinguish in detail, nor to point out all the numerous non-essentials. But the following tests may be used by anyone who desires to guide himself practically in discriminating between the permanent and the transitory elements in any religion. Is it ancient? Is it to be found in the ancient scriptures? Has it the authority of the founder of the religion, or of the sages to whom the formulation of the particular religion is due? Is it universal, found under some form in all religions? As regards spiritual truths, anyone of these tests is sufficient.

Sample Pages





Sikhism

Item Code:
NAI093
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
2005
ISBN:
8170594677
Language:
English
Size:
7 inch X 5 inch
Pages:
59
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 75 gms
Price:
$5.00   Shipping Free
Be the first to rate this product
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Sikhism
From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 4533 times since 24th Jan, 2018
About the Author

Annie Besant (1847-1933), second President of the Theosophical Society (1907-1933), was described as a 'Diamond Soul' for she had many brilliant facets to her character. She was an outstanding orator of her time, a champion of human freedom, educationist, philanthropist and author with more than three hundred books and pamphlets to her credit. She also guided thousands of men and women all over the world in their spiritual quest.

In her earlier days in England, she did remarkable work as a Freethinker and Fabian socialist, and supported many noble causes including women's rights. From 1893, she lived in India and worked indefatigably for the cultural and spiritual renaissance of the country. She organized the Home Rule movement and inspired Indians with a dynamic vision of India's future.

Foreword

The following lecture does not pretend to be any- thing more than a popular exposition, intended for the ordinary reader rather than for the student. Delivered to audiences composed almost entirely of Hindus, with only a sprinkling of Zoroastrians and Christians, they rather take for granted a knowledge of Sanskrit terms; so notes have been added where obscurity might arise from their use. They are intended to help members of each of the religions to recognize the value and beauty of faiths which are not their own, and demonstrate their underlying unity.

In the lecture on Buddhism I had especially in mind the misconceptions which shut the Lord Buddha out from the hearts of his countrymen, and strove to remove them by quotations from the received scriptures containing the authoritative records of his own words. For indeed I know of no greater service that could be rendered to religion than to draw together again these sundered faiths which almost divide between them the Eastern world. Mother- and daughter they are, and family feuds are proverbially bitter; yet might the quarrel be healed, if the desire for amity reigned on both sides.

Less deeply rooted, but more bitter, was the antagonism to Christianity, exasperated by the ignorant and often coarse and abusive attacks levelled by the lower class of missionaries against the venerable faith held by nearly all my hearers. Yet they listened respectfully and after a while sympathetically to the exposition of the faith so young in comparison with their own, and finally recognized that it also was a great religion, and was not really alien from Hinduism. I can wish these lectures no better fate than that they may act as a message of peace to the hearts of their readers, as they evidently did to the hearts of their hearers.

The general principles underlying these lectures are the following: Each religion is looked at in the light of occult knowledge, both as regards its history and its teachings. Without despising the conclusions arrived at by the patient and admirable work of European scholars, I have unhesitatingly cast them aside where they conflict with important facts preserved in occult history, whether in those imperishable records where all the past is still to be found in living pictures, or in ancient documents carefully stored up by Initiates and not wholly inaccessible. Especially is this the case with regard to the ages of Hinduism and Zoroastrianism, touching which modern scholarship is ludicrously astray. That scholarship, however, will regard the occult view as being, in its turn, grotesquely wrong. Be it so. Occultism can wait to be justified by discoveries, as so many of its much-ridiculed statements as to antiquity have already been. The earth is a faithful guardian, and as the archeologist uncovers the cities buried within her, many an unexpected witness will be found to justify the antiquity that is claimed.

Secondly, each religion is treated as coming from the one great Brotherhood, which is the steward and custodian of spiritual knowledge. Each is treated as an expression, by some member or messenger of that Brotherhood, of the eternal spiritual truths, an expression suited to the needs of the time at which it was made, and of the dawning civilization that it was intended to mould and to guide in its evolution. Each religion has its own mission in the world, is suited to the nations to whom it is given, and to the type of civilization it is to permeate, bringing it into line with the general evolution of the human family. The failure to see this leads to unjust criticism, for an ideally perfect religion would not be suitable to imperfect and partially evolved men, and environment must always be considered by the Wise when they plant a new slip of the ancient tree of wisdom.

Thirdly, an attempt is made to distinguish the essential from the non-essential in each religion, and to treat chiefly the former. For every religion, in the course of time, suffers from accretions due to ignorance, not to wisdom; to blindness, not to vision. Within the brief compass of a lecture, it was not possible to distinguish in detail, nor to point out all the numerous non-essentials. But the following tests may be used by anyone who desires to guide himself practically in discriminating between the permanent and the transitory elements in any religion. Is it ancient? Is it to be found in the ancient scriptures? Has it the authority of the founder of the religion, or of the sages to whom the formulation of the particular religion is due? Is it universal, found under some form in all religions? As regards spiritual truths, anyone of these tests is sufficient.

Sample Pages





Post a Comment
 
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to Sikhism (History | Books)

Philosophical Perspectives of Sikhism
Item Code: NAH580
$19.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Sikhism and Women (History, Texts, And Experience)
Item Code: IHL253
$47.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Historical Dictionary of SIKHISM
Item Code: IDG029
$34.50
SOLD
Sikhism and History
Item Code: IDF879
$44.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Lives and Teachings of the Sikh Gurus
Item Code: IDG953
$29.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Illustrated History of The Sikhs
Item Code: IDF224
$120.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Guru Gobind Singh and Creation of Khalsa
Item Code: IDF493
$29.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Life and Work of Guru Arjan
Item Code: IDH548
$45.00
SOLD
WHO IS SIKH?: THE PROBLEM OF SIKH IDENTITY
Item Code: IDG633
$19.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Sikh Wedding
Item Code: IDG827
$31.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Sikh Cultural Traditions. Customs Manners and Ceremonies
Deal 20% Off
Item Code: NAG055
$31.00$24.80
You save: $6.20 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
Shiva came today.  More wonderful  in person than the images  indicate.  Fast turn around is a bonus. Happy trail to you.
Henry, USA
Namaskaram. Thank you so much for my beautiful Durga Mata who is now present and emanating loving and vibrant energy in my home sweet home and beyond its walls.   High quality statue with intricate detail by design. Carved with love. I love it.   Durga herself lives in all of us.   Sathyam. Shivam. Sundaram.
Rekha, Chicago
People at Exotic India are Very helpful and Supportive. They have superb collection of everything related to INDIA.
Daksha, USA
I just wanted to let you know that the book arrived safely today, very well packaged. Thanks so much for your help. It is exactly what I needed! I will definitely order again from Exotic India with full confidence. Wishing you peace, health, and happiness in the New Year.
Susan, USA
Thank you guys! I got the book! Your relentless effort to set this order right is much appreciated!!
Utpal, USA
You guys always provide the best customer care. Thank you so much for this.
Devin, USA
On the 4th of January I received the ordered Peacock Bell Lamps in excellent condition. Thank you very much. 
Alexander, Moscow
Gracias por todo, Parvati es preciosa, ya le he recibido.
Joan Carlos, Spain
We received the item in good shape without any damage. It is simply gorgeous. Look forward to more business with you. Thank you.
Sarabjit, USA
Your sculpture is truly beautiful and of inspiring quality!  I wish you continuous great success so that you may always be able to offer such beauty to all people throughout the world! Thank you for caring about your customers as well as the standard of your products.  It is extremely appreciated!! Sending you much love.
Deborah, USA
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2021 © Exotic India