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History of Music

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History of Music
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Item Code: IDJ427
Author: S. M. Tagore
Publisher: Oriental Books Centre, Delhi
Edition: 2006
ISBN: 8183150411
Pages: 342
Cover: Hardcover
Other Details: 8.6 X" 5.5"
From the Jacket

Music pervades all nature. It is coeval with the creation. There is nothing in nature that arouses our attention or affects our feelings so quickly as a sound. The murmuring of water, the sighs of the zephyrs, the whispers of the evening breeze, the roar of the storms, the chirpings of the birds, the cries of the animals, the hum of distant multitudes and the concussion of sonorous bodies, excite in our minds feelings of pleasure, pain or fear and contain in them the germs of music. A musical sound is a noise, no doubt, but every noise is not a musical sound. There is a marked difference between the two. Noise is a confused combination of sounds resulting from the concussion of non-elastic bodies; musical sound is a pure harmonious effect, produced from a simple elastic body, such as the tone of a bell. It files further and is heard at a greater distance than a noise. The musical instruments played at a gathering may be heard at a distance of a mile, but the noise made by the people at the gathering, however overpowering it may be on the spot, is scarcely audible at a similar distance. Sound (Sanskrit, Nada) has been described as either inarticulate (Dhanyatmaka) or articulate (Varnatmaka). Instrumental music is considered inarticulate and vocal music articulate. By the curious structure of the vocal organs, man is capable of making a greater variety of tones than any other animal and has at his disposal the power of giving expression to every emotion. The human voice, in its tone and accent, is undoubtedly the purest and most sonorous of any which distinguishes the vocal animals.

Preface

In this book furnish an account of the music of various nations, civilized or uncivilized, on the ace of the habitable globe. It must be acknowledged, however, that his treatise does not pretend to be exhaustive, nor are the descriptions characterized by a uniformity of system in the manipulation of the subject. Specimens of the songs of different nations have been given in this book, not only because Music and Poetry are, according to Sanskrit lore, presided over by one and the same deity, Sarasvati, and are, therefore, intimately connected with each other, but also because an acquaintance with the spirit of a nation's songs facilitates the understanding of the spirit of its music and poetry which are but the outward expression of the inner workings of a nation's heart.

A few facts concerning Hindu music are given a place in the Appendix. To enter into details of the kind in the body of the work would be going beyond its general scope.

My acknowledgments are pre-eminently due to the authors of the several valuable works from which I have gleaned the materials for this compilation. They have been alluded to in some portion or other of the book. Including editors of Encyclopaedias, Musical Dictionaries and Gazetteers, and publishers of general history and geography I take this opportunity of tendering my grateful thanks.

CONTENTS

Prefacev
Introduction1
National Music10
The Savage Nations12
ASIA
China 19
Siam27
Japan31
Corea/Koria36
Thibet/Tibet38
Baramah/Burma39
India44
Hindu Period44
Mahomedan Period47
British Period52
North-Western Provinces52
Central Provinces54
Hyderabad55
Mysore and Coorg55
Bombay/Mumbai57
Madras/Chennai58
Ancient Punjab/Punjab60
Nepal63
Bengal, Behar/Bihar and Orissa65
Ceylon/Srilanka77
Persia79
Arabia85
Turkestan90
Turkey in Asia92
Assyria93
Phoenicia97
Asia Minor98
Palestine98
AFRICA
North-Eastern Africa106
Egypt106
Abyssinia115
Nubia117
Northern Africa119
Algeria119
Morocco119
Tunis119
Fezzan120
Western Africa121
Upper Guinea125
Ashantee125
Dahomey127
Benin128
Lower Guinea128
Congo128
Central Africa129
Sahara131
Soudan131
Bornou132
Sourthern Africa134
Kaffraria135
Hottentotia138
Zululand141
Eastern Africa142
Madagascar143
EUROPE
Greece144
Ancient Period144
Turkey152
Roumania159
Servia160
Austria161
Hungary163
Bohemia163
Dalmatia163
Calcia163
Tyrol164
Styria164
Russia165
Poland169
Finland169
Lapland171
Seandinavia172
Norway172
Sweden172
Denmark175
Holland177
Belgium178
Germany180
Switzerland188
Italy191
Ancient Period191
Modern Period194
Sicily201
Sardinia201
Spain202
Portugal205
France206
England213
Scotland228
Ireland234
Iceland239
AMERICA
General Remarks240
North America242
Greenland242
The United States245
Alaska247
Dakota248
Arisona250
New Mexico250
British America251
Canada251
British Columbia252
Vancouver Island252
Mexico252
Norfolk Sound254
Port des Francais255
Nootka Sound255
Lake Superior256
The West Indies257
Cuba257
Jamaica257
Central America259
South America260
Guiana260
Colombia262
Peru263
Chili263
Brazil264
Bolivia262
OCEANIA
Malaysia267
Java268
Borneo270
Australasia272
Australia272
New Hebrides275
New Zealand275
New Caledonia281
New Guinea282
Polynesia283
Marquesas Islands283
Society Islands284
Fiji Islands285
Sandwich Islands287
Tonga or Friendly Islands291
APPENDIX
A Few Facts Concerning Hindu Music295
The Three Gramas295
The Six Ragas297
The Eight Rasas297
The Seat of Music in the human body298
The origin of sound299
Murcchana300
Suddha Tana301
Kuta Tana302
Music as a means to salvation307
Dancing 308
The three Gramas308
The Seven notes309
The Eight Rasas310
Music and Astronomy311
Music and Astrology313
Comparative Table of Castes313
Music and Medicine314
Music and Poetry315
Music and Grammar316
Music and Logic319
The Srutis320
Music and Rhetoric320
The Seasons325
Conclusion326
Index327
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