Tibetan Buddhist Vajrapani

Tibetan Buddhist Vajrapani

$595
In Mahayana Buddhism, Vajrapani is said to be one of the original bodhisattvas on their tradition. Vajrapani, from the Sanskrit word for thunderbolt (vajra) and "in the hand" (pani), is the protector of the Buddha. Eventually, Vajrapani was known to be a representation of the Buddha's power. Vajrapanani, along with Manjushri and Avalokiteshvara, all symbolize the Buddha’s virtues. The latter two represent the Buddha’s wisdom and compassion, while Vajrapani represents all of the Buddha’s power.

Vajrapani is associated with the Hindu god Indra, as the latter is also a god of thunder. In this thangka, he is depicted with blue skin and eight hands. On one hand, he holds his vajra, which he used to rock the mountains and this tool is associated with Indra (lightning and hardness of diamonds). He also has the wheel of the dharma that symbolizes knowledge. His central pair of hands are in a mudra. The victory banner on his lower right hand represents success. Meanwhile, on his right side, one hand holds a ritual bell. The knot on his other hands represents endless harmony. Meanwhile, the flaming swords are symbolic of cutting duality and ignorance. The flames on his halo and aura match well with his act of dancing, representing transformation. He also has three faces which are all wrathful akin to the yaksha. This is to instill fear for a person to lose his dogmatism or as a representation of Vajrapani being free from hatred. He also wears a crown of skulls to complete this aesthetic.

Item Code: TY46
Specifications:
Tibetan Thangka Painting
Size of Painted Surface 17.0 inch X 24.0 inch
Size with Brocade 32.0 inch X 49.0 inch
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